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The Official Guide To HID Burners (Your Key To Making Sense Of Them All)

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  • The Official Guide To HID Burners (Your Key To Making Sense Of Them All)



    The Origin of the HID Bulb



    The first commercial automotive HID bulbs were first introduced in 1991, as an option on the BMW 7-series. This first system used an unshielded, non-replaceable burner designated D1 — a designation that would be recycled years later for an entirely different type of burner. The AC ballast was about the size of a building brick. The first American-made effort at HID headlamps was on the 1996-98 Lincoln Mark-VIII, which used reflector headlamps with an unmasked, integral-ignitor burner made by Sylvania and designated Type 9500. This was the only system to operate on DC; reliability proved inferior to the AC systems. The Type 9500 system was not used on any other models, and was discontinued after Osram's takeover of Sylvania. All HID headlamps worldwide presently use the standardized AC-operated bulbs and ballasts.


    What do the different letters and numbers used to identify the bulb mean?


    The 'D' stands for discharge, the numbers (1, 2, 3 or 4) designate the type while the last letter ('R' or 'S') is used to determine what kind of application the bulb is meant to be used in.

    The 'R' burners – D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, D5R, D6R, D7R & D8R – These types of burners have an opaque shield covering specific portions of the bulb because they are intended for use in specifically designed reflector headlamp optics. 'R' burners tend to have 300‒400 less lumen than their 'S' counterparts.

    The 'S' burners – D1S, D2S, D3S, D4S, D5S, D6S, D7S & D8S –These types of burners are unobstructed by any kind of bulb shield because they are designed for use in projector headlamp optics. 'S' burners tend to have 300
    ‒400 more lumen than their 'R' counterparts.



    The Old-School Burners (D2R/D2S, D1R/D1S)


    D2
    R & D2S




    The D2R & D2S were the first mainstream type of HID burners with Philips setting the standard for what HID bulbs could/should be with the release of their 85122 bulb. The D2R/D2S bulbs have an ignitor separate from the base of the bulb unlike that of the D1R/D1S/D3R/D3S systems which feature built-in ignitors. Today, The D2R/D2S remains one of the most versatile HID burners because of it's many available bulb options to satisfy a wide variety of styles and tastes. The D2R/D2S burner is considered less environmentally friendly when compared to it's newer burner sibling, the D4R/D4S, due to it's use of mercury and operational voltage of 85 V compared to 42 V.


    D1
    R & D1S



    D1S is a further development to D2S, to increase safety and eliminate the need to mount ballast inside or onto headlamp. The base of a D1S bulb has an ignitor built in, eliminating the need to transfer 23kV through a cable. The Less components that can be harmed by mechanical impact, the safer it is. Since D1S is a newer technology compared to D2R/D2S systems, it offers several advantages such as less noise (EMI and RFI) and allows for much longer cable length from ballast to lamp (10-20 ft) for D1S, only 1-3 ft max for D2S past the ignitor. The D1R/D1S burner is considered less environmentally friendly when compared to it's newer D3R/D3S burner sibling because of it's use of mercury and operational voltage of 85 V compared to 42 V.
    If your car uses the D1 series of burners and you would like the flexibility of using D2 bulbs (The D2 burner has the most bulb choices of any burner available) in your D1 application, An aftermarket company by the name XeVision makes a product known as the XeSparQ which allows you to do just that.



    The E
    co-Friendly Generation (D3R/D3S, D4R/D4S)



    D3
    R & D3S




    The world's first mercury-free high intensity discharge (HID) headlamp system was created in 2004 through a joint effort between Koito, Denso, Toyota and Royal Philips Electronics. Koito partnered with Philips to develop the mercury-free discharge bulb while also partnering with Denso to develop the ballast needed for lighting the new mercury-free discharge bulb. Together, these developments led to the world's first mercury-free HID headlamp system that provided bright lighting and long bulb life, equal to that of a conventional HID headlamp system.

    Only starting around the year 2009 did some automobile manufacturers start offering Eco-friendly HID bulbs that operated at a lower ballast output voltage than the original xenon bulbs and did not contain any mercury like that of the original D1 and D2 series HID bulbs. The D3R/D3S is nearly identical to the D1R/D1S in every way but is considered more Eco-friendly due to it's mercury-free nature and is designed for the lower-voltage ballasts that come on some newer vehicles. The D3R/D3S bulbs operate on a nominal voltage of around 42 V (A testament to their 50% greater energy efficiency when compared to the 85 V used by it's older D1R/D1S sibling).
    The D3R/D3S burners are not interchangeable with D1R/D1S burners.



    D4
    R & D4S




    The world's first mercury-free high intensity discharge (HID) headlamp system was created in 2004 through a joint effort between Koito, Denso, Toyota and Royal Philips Electronics. Koito partnered with Philips to develop the mercury-free discharge bulb while also partnering with Denso to develop the ballast needed for lighting the new mercury-free discharge bulb. Together, these developments led to the world's first mercury-free HID headlamp system that provided bright lighting and long bulb life, equal to that of a conventional HID headlamp system.

    Only starting around the year 2009 did some automobile manufacturers start offering Eco-friendly HID bulbs that operated at a lower ballast output voltage than the original xenon bulbs and did not contain any mercury like that of the original D1 and D2 series HID bulbs. The D4R/D4S is nearly identical to the D2R/D2S in every way
    but is considered more Eco-friendly due to it's mercury-free nature and is designed for the lower-voltage ballasts that come on some newer vehicles. The D4R/D4S bulbs operate on a nominal voltage of around 42 V (A testament to their 50% greater energy efficiency when compared to the 85 V used by it's older D2R/D2S sibling). The D4R/D4S burners are not interchangeable D2R/D2S burners.



    The Low-Power, Eco-Friendly Generation
    (D5R/D5S, D6R/D6S, D7R/D7S, D8R/D8S)


    D5
    R & D5S


    This is a new category of gas discharge light source with the latest, high efficiency, mercury free technology, providing 2000 lm at 25W. The main target is middle class vehicles, today equipped with halogen headlamps. Application in these vehicles without additional installation requirements allows for a higher illumination on the road at lower power consumption. This is beneficial to both
    traffic safety and environmental protection. D5S extends the existing range of D1S and D3S categories that have the starter integrated with the light source, where the ballast is a discrete component. In the case of D5S however, the ballast is integrated with the light source, too. A high voltage connection is thus avoided; only a 12V input is necessary. D5S is very compact, which results in less volume and build-in depth of the headlamp under the hood. The low volume may also be attractive to motorcycle headlamps.


    D6R & D6S


    This is a new category of gas discharge light source with the latest, high efficiency, mercury free technology, providing 2000 lm at 25W. The main target is middle class vehicles, today equipped with halogen headlamps. Application in these vehicles without additional installation requirements allows for a higher illumination on the road at lower power consumption. This is beneficial to both
    traffic safety and environmental protection. D6S extends the existing range of D2S and D4S categories, where the starter and ballast are discrete components. Hence components can be replaced each when necessary.


    D7
    R & D7S


    I'm not aware of too many details regarding this burner type but I think it's safe to assume it also operates at 25W with an output of around 2000 lumen. If you have any addition info about this burner, let me know.


    D8
    R & D8S


    The D8 bulbs are the latest generation of HID burners characterized by their high energy efficiency. They operate at 25W and thus produce less lumen than an average 35W HID bulb (2000 lumen vs 3000-3400 lumen). The D8 series is believed to replace low-end halogen systems as a more energy efficient option.





    Credits:

    Shopower (For their description of the D1R/D1S burners)

    GTR Lighting (For their description of the D3R/D3S & D4R/D4S burners)


    HIDP member 'Voltron' (For information regarding the D5R/D5S & D6R/D6S from the ECE)

    HIDP member 'Petraman' & Osram (For information regarding D8R/D8S)

    HIDP member 'D1S' (For some information pertaining to the D1R/D1S burner)


    Denso (Informational press release detailing the creation of the first mercury-free HID bulb)




    Note: I decided to create this guide to help everyone easily identify and understand the different types of HID burners that have been created thus far (as it can get confusing). I decided to do this because I noticed the lack of a cohesive guide for detailing the different burner types. This guide is very much a work-in progress and as such will be updated as time goes on. If you have any relevant/helpful information you would like to contribute and/or see added, Please message me and I will update the guide as well as crediting you for your contribution.

    Last Updated - (12/18/12)

    Last edited by Sean Lezner; December 20th, 2012, 12:01 PM.

    RX350BX (EU) | STI-R | XB35 Ballasts| HD Relay | 66240 CBI | JDM AStar LED Int. | AFSpec LED Ext.

  • #2
    Great post Sean!

    Comment


    • #3
      I had no idea there were D3, 5, 6, 7.

      05 300C - 15 Taurus SHO

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      • #4
        Is it D1s and D5s socket compatible? I mean, may I install D1s bulb in projector with D5s socket?

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