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HOWTO - Making mating electrical housings

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  • HOWTO - Making mating electrical housings

    I recently got a set of retrofits with Toyota/Kioto ballasts. Unfortunately, they did not come with the power plugs, the previous owner was just using spade connectors which seemed why too prone to falling off.

    I tried hitting up ebay and the usual haunts, but turned up empty, so I made my own. For all I know, someone may have them for sale, but it's snowing, I'm impatient and might prove useful for others.

    So here goes...

    Here's a pic of the ballast and connector. Female spade terminals fit, but worried about them staying put. So I'm making some out of Raycrete (a safe, non-toxic polyurethane, that cleans up easily (lemon juice) and has a nice slow transition from viscous to solid).

    It's recommended as an electronics potting material, so no worries. I've used this for a lot of things, from mounting my LCD into my Double din, to making a shifter out of it. It can be colored with concrete colorant (though I don't know what that is composed off, so might effect conductivity), the only pain is painting it, some paints just won't stick. A flexible bumper primer like Transtar 2&1 works well though.

    The ballast...


    The rough fit, 10ga is overkill, but all I had that wasn't too small.


    Raycrete, love this stuff (also goes by the name EZ-Poly now)


    I make a little dam of tape. If I had taken my time, I could have gotten a better looking part, like making a cardboard dam.


    For a release, I cover the spade terminals with two sacrifical ones (so I don't have to worry about cleaning the female contacts) and spray inside the dam with PAM non-stick cooking spray, buttery goodness!


    Make sure the terminals are upright and spaced correctly (mine were bent a little), otherwise, might be difficult to plug,unplug, OTOH, the insulated spades have some room for play, but not that much.


    Hate wasting material, so I'll use the excess for a mount for my boost phone that I use with my CarPC. The reason I always save the packaging.



    Mix up the Raycrete, equal parts A&B at first it's a like runny pancake battery, carefully put some in and let it sink, try not to move the wires!


    After about 20 minutes, use a popsicle stick to remove whatever dripped, it's kind of like cookie dough at this point.


    Why not?


    After about 40 minutes, it's firm enough where it should have a skin, so carefully remove the tape. Not that pretty but the stuff is easy to sand, for a spur of the moment project, not bad. I'm more concerned with it working than being pretty.




    At this point, it's still soft, so trim any overhang that may cause problems, I just used a little screwdriver to trace out the edge of the connector.



    About 1:20 after pouring, I demold, a little early, but if it's going to catch, I'll still have some play as it's not full strength yet.

    Not too shabby! Due to the lazy tape job (glossy cardboard bent into the proper shape probably would have worked better) I got an air bubble or two, but it's done. They came off without too much effort, but not too easy like the plug should. The tab works on the one that's has it (the other was missing before starting it).




    Now for some finishing...

    It's still not set to full hardness, so it's easy to sand and shape. A little flexing of the wire makes most of what's on it pop off. A few minutes with the handsanding and just about done.



    Not too bad, these things are not slipping out, perfect fit. If I had taken a little more time, probably could have made them pass for OEM. A little tape and it will look fine.

    Now that they are cleaned up, going back in until tomorrow when they are fully hardened. Then I'll clean up any residue from the PAM with contact cleaner. A few hours on a snow day, not too bad. I spent more time trying to track the originals down



    Oh and why not, the phone cradle, this I should have waited until tomorrow to demold, almost cracked as it's only 1/4 to 3/8 thick.



    Hope someone finds this useful

  • #2
    That's a great write up, thanks for the post!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nissan_maxima
      That's a great write up, thanks for the post!
      Thanks, turned out pretty well for a spur of the moment thing. Love when a project goes to plan

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey it looks sweet. Where do you get this stuff and how much? Never heard of it before.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by wcbcruzer
          Hey this stuff looks great. How strong is it? I am thinking about using it to fill up the sides of my projector so it's waterproof. These are going to go on my bumper exposed to the outside world.

          Do you think it'll work?

          Oh and where do you get it?? Never seen it before.
          Well they recommend it as a potting material (so it's good for covering electrical components according to them) and it can be used for underwater repairs (though when mixing, water makes it expand!)

          It's pretty strong once fully cured. Very hard. When it does break, tends to crack but I've never had it yet unless I was trying to with tools.

          I made a shifter out of it a couple years ago (that's a track ball mouse in there btw) , held up great. There is now a small gouge or two from always resting my double din case on it when working on my electronics. (sharp corners on the case and somewhat heavy), other than that fine.



          I pretty much whittled it. Easy to work. the first six hours.

          I should also mention that it's been holding my grill together after someone smashed it and people have used it for auto body repair (see their site)


          Paint doesn't like to stick to it as mentioned, but you can color it as well.

          I think Lowe's has it, I got a case from a plumbing supply. I think they sell it under the name EZ-Poly as well.

          Here's the website (has where to buy).
          http://www.raycrete.com/

          As far as heat, might want to check the data sheet, I have no idea how hot projectors get, been wondering myself.

          If not painted, it tends to get very yellow in sunlight over time.

          Some pics of fabbing the shifter with it here

          Comment


          • #6
            nice...I need a new shifter too...my old carbon fiber is cracking
            My feedback...lol I know
            http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/view...812&highlight=

            09 Civic SI Alabaster Silver Metallic Sedan
            01 Civic EX Coupe 5 Speed RIP

            Comment


            • #7
              good job! but I always just solder the joints and use quick disconnect spade connectors else where... not that your way isn't better, but I don't have that much patientce

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ocelaris
                good job! but I always just solder the joints and use quick disconnect spade connectors else where... not that your way isn't better, but I don't have that much patientce
                LOL, that didn't even occur to me. Not like I don't solder stuff all the time. I could have still potted them.

                Anyway, honestly, it was about 20 minutes of work, interspersed between waits. The whole thing took about 3 hours if that, waiting included.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'll have to pick some of that stuff up next time I see it, it's available at home depot/lowes type places?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ocelaris
                    I'll have to pick some of that stuff up next time I see it, it's available at home depot/lowes type places?
                    They may, I'm not sure. You can buy it online easy enough though.

                    BTW, Raycrete became EZ-Poly, and the stuff I use is the same as what they now call EZ-Poly multi-mender

                    Here is the newer website that lets you order online, but if you call the number listed, I'm sure you an get a list of distributors.

                    http://www.ez-poly.net/shop.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That's pretty good work, I moved it into the University section, so if you wanna add any more generic tid bits about making molds for parts etc... that might be useful also, this seems to be a good place to start.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ocelaris
                        That's pretty good work, I moved it into the University section, so if you wanna add any more generic tid bits about making molds for parts etc... that might be useful also, this seems to be a good place to start.
                        Thanks. I do a lot of stuff like this, but a lot would be kind of OT here, if I have anything that isn't, I'll post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You'd be suprised now much this general knowledge about materials etc... can come in handy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Defunct

                            Sadly they seem to have gone out of business. I am going to try something different (PC-7)and see if it works.
                            Originally posted by shotgunefx View Post
                            They may, I'm not sure. You can buy it online easy enough though.

                            BTW, Raycrete became EZ-Poly, and the stuff I use is the same as what they now call EZ-Poly multi-mender

                            Here is the newer website that lets you order online, but if you call the number listed, I'm sure you an get a list of distributors.

                            http://www.ez-poly.net/shop.htm

                            Comment

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