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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • gold94corolla
    replied
    Yeah it would suck to trim the edge so that it looks good now, only to have it deform or something and leave a gap.

    I can mark up those pics if you can't see what I see lol

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  • satrya
    replied
    ^

    Yes, I'll deal with the tearduct edge eventually. But not untill I finalize the 3D curvature. And I want to make sure the plastic piece doesn't settle into a different shape and show unwanted opening or misalignment.

    Until then, the tearduct can't be trimmed off.

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  • gold94corolla
    replied
    arrrrrrrrrrrrgghhhhhh

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  • csjoh
    replied
    +1 on paint. Black looks unfinished.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Black trim piece

    I've been driving with the latest trim version for the past few days. I still like the trim piece matched to the body color paint than black.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
    I still think that you need to do that bottom inner corner better lol
    Yes. But not at this point. That'll have to be done once the mounts are complete, and then both sides mounted on the vehicle. I have to be mindful that any trimming would permanently remove that material, and when I make curve adjustments (by heat bending) almost anywhere, the position of the edges can change dramatically. So far, I've been test driving the latest version for a few days to see whether or not any of the curves retain their shape. I'd rather not find out I've done something irreversible and incorrect that forces me to make another iteration.

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  • gold94corolla
    replied
    I still think that you need to do that bottom inner corner better lol

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  • satrya
    replied
    3 iterations of the trim pieces

    Comparing previous iterations of the foglight trim pieces; each of them showing the passenger side face-up, and driver side face down. All of them start from the same "raw material".

    The top pair was my original trim pieces (circa ~10 years ago). The plastic surfaces aren't modified, so the "flat" portion is really flat. Also, there are 2 pairs of 2 holes on the top portion for metal tabs to be bolted onto. On the bottom is a single hole for a custom bracket. The round opening is much closer to a circle compared to the newer ones. This is because the OEM 7" foglights sit further back into the oem bumper cover's recess.

    The middle pair is the first version in this build thread. The plastic surfaces are heat bent to curve along the oem bumper cover, and the edges are rounded somewhat. I took the metal tabs from the first iteration, and mounted it to a metal bracket that mounts to the plastic piece using 2 screws sitting on a less visible surface.

    The bottom pair is the latest version in this build thread. More curves, and more material is left to curve inwards for a more wholesome 3D look. A new bracket containing tabs are mounted with screws that are completely hidden. The bottom side retains the middle pair's mounting method.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Bending the plastic piece instead of the tab

    To avoid clearance issues with the screws that bolt the metal bracket (with the two tabs), I decided to bend the inward portion of the plastic piece instead (see left side, taped off). This means that the metal bracket doesn't have any bend. This is a deviation from the initial plan when I used the cardstock.


    Transfer the cardstock bracket onto the metal piece. I drilled pilot holes along the cut lines, and clamped the metal bracket onto a vise grip and bent the piece on the cut line until the material yields and breaks. Then, re straighten the metal plate. After a lot of filing and smoothing, it mounts like so:


    From the outside, only the two tabs can be seen, and the rest of the bracket tucks in neatly.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Upper tabs

    Redoing the upper tabs that will mount the black plastic piece to the slots in the oem bumper cover shown here (blue pen points to one of them):


    First, make a cardstock replica of a galvanized steel plate, replete with the steel plate's holes.


    The tabs are spaced closer than the length of the plate. Cut the replica to span the width between the tabs. Two tabs will be on the edges of this bracket.


    The plan is to bolt the bracket with the tabs bent upwards, and the rest of the bracket sitting flush with the portion of the black plastic piece that "folds" inwards into the bumper cover opening. In this case, it is to the right.


    The point is to move the (cardstock) bracket around such that the black plastic piece sits just right. I did this by taping the bracket onto the plastic piece, checking the ensemble by inserting the tabs into the slots in the bumper cover, and seeing if the black plastic piece is in too deep our juts out too much. Like so.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
    yeah it does need adjustment
    Indeed. What I meant was that at that stage, there are more adjustments that can only be done when placed right there instead of sitting comfortably inside the house and hope that the bends match 100%.

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  • gold94corolla
    replied
    yeah it does need adjustment

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  • satrya
    replied
    On the spot adjustments

    The next step of adjustments have to be done on the oem bumper cover's foglight opening. Top and bottom clearance adjusted by adjusting where the sharp bend happens. Outer edge needs to be curved inwards more.


    Outer edge heat-bent further. Inner edge needs adjustment.


    Similar process for the driver's side

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    Looks nice.

    It's always good to learn from first pass prototypes.
    Thanks. Yes, but for an amateur (like me, which doesn't expect to see much more number of retrofits than a handful), some of that learning goes away again over time.

    When I started my retrofit, it had been about 10 years since I've applied clear headlight & paint film as well as window tint. Working on the headlight film on my retrofit feels like I've lost all that experience a decade ago. I don't think that would be the case for pros that keep on doing it on a regular basis.

    What I'm trying to say is that much of my learning from this will soon be forgotten (by me).

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Looks nice.

    It's always good to learn from first pass prototypes.

    Leave a comment:

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