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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • csjoh
    replied
    That's kinda extreme as well, so for joining two pieces of plastic together in, say, a headlight housing, I think it should do nicely. The plastic welding works well, but the fumes that are released when plastic melts just seep into everything and doesn't seem to want to move back out; hence I'm looking for an alternative. I found the variant you use on eBay, and while the product wasn't too expensive, shipping it over here was killer. I'll try to source it locally first before spending $15 on product and $40 on shipping...

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    Oooh, I need to get some of that stuff!

    How solid is it? Does the cement give when exposed to presure and stress, or is it like the bonded pieces were never separated?
    1 day in, the cement seems reasonably flexible. I tried bending it, and it cracks a bit on the part that coats the plastic pieces, but the portion that fills the gap seem to hold up. I don't imagine it will survive repeated bending though.

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  • csjoh
    replied
    Oooh, I need to get some of that stuff!

    How solid is it? Does the cement give when exposed to presure and stress, or is it like the bonded pieces were never separated?

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Experimenting with ABS cement (and hoping to deal with reaction with paint primer later; per romanster's remark in post # 851) to see how it fares to fill small gaps.

    First, I taped two scrap strips from the fog trim material together.


    Filled the gap with a glop of the ABS cement


    An hour later, the gap seems to be filled decently. Plus the blue tape didn't actually stick to it; which may or may not be a good thing. (yes, I missed the camera's focus by a few centimeters further down where it's supposed to be)

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    Progress! Wooo!
    Thx. Took me a while to go ahead with that arresting clip idea. I wasn't sure about the two screws getting in the way.

    I'm open to other ideas; not that I'm in a hurry to finish this.

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  • csjoh
    replied
    Progress! Wooo!

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  • satrya
    replied
    The foglight trim is now mechanically secured at 4 points.

    The first 2 points are the flat tabs that go into 2 slots on the bumper cover like so:


    The 3rd point is the new arresting clip, with the arrowhead piece snap fitting behind the 7" housing:


    And finally, the 4th point is the screw, that goes onto a custom mounting bracket:


    Like so:


    Note that I've been driving with the previous configuration for many months now, so the arresting clip is not essential for securing the foglight trim. However, it helps maintain a certain gap between the foglight trim and the 7" housing. The arresting clip will be adjusted later (the pictures were taken during the functional test, without further adjustment done yet).

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  • satrya
    replied
    There needs to be at least 2 holes to secure the metal plate to prevent rotation of the plate.


    Tape the plate onto the area, and transfer the locations of the holes. Drill through. I used a brass plate that hardware stores sell (e.g. Ace hardware has a hobby train related parts area with small metal bars / plates / strips / sheets).


    Bend the other end to form an arrowhead shape; the amount of bend on the arrowhead is adjusted to cling onto the backside of the protrusion of the 7" housing.

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  • satrya
    replied
    The fog trim around that area has an small extension, but not long or rigid enough to become the arresting clip. The idea is to add a metal plate that serves as the arresting clip.

    First, mark where the top and bottom edges of the extension are on the 7" lens, by placing tape on the lens:


    Then, place another tape alongside the thickness of the 7" housing's protrusion, to get the thickness of the protrusion marked onto the tape:


    I could've used calipers to take precise measurements, but it will become evident that this is not necessary.

    Transfer that tape back to the fog trim. Now we have a template on how far the arresting clip should be going into the foglight opening before making a bend that latches onto the 7" housing's protrusion.


    Another view of the template for the arresting clip, as seen from the inner side of the foglight trim:

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  • satrya
    replied
    Fastening clip

    The latest fog trim design (bottom pair) has two flat tabs on top, and one hole for a screw on the inner bottom side (i.e. closer to the license plate). But the outer bottom side (i.e. closer to the fender) doesn't mount onto anything:


    I decided to experiment on making a fastening clip that latches onto the back of the 7" housing's round surface; as can be seen in this older picture. The transition from the round front lens to the rectangular housing has the round part forming a protrusion where a clip can latch onto.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Heated plastic

    Decided to experiment with filling the gaps with the same material after being heated. Took a thin strip of the material, placed it in front of a heat gun for a few seconds until the material appears pliable, and then inserted the pliable material into the gap with a spatula.

    Top piece shows some of the gaps filled. Bottom piece shows how the notches without the filling. Using a heated spatula, I then try to smooth out the filling. Sanding comes next.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fallenangel View Post
    Crumble some styrofoam into acetone and you should have liquaid plastic after 24 hours, maybe it will help you fill the gaps. It should work in theory. Many people said it works.
    Thanks. I've seen at least one video of mixing styrofoam and acetone; I guess I had my mind set on using ABS plastic. I might need to consider that.

    Originally posted by romanster View Post
    Satrya if you dip a paper towel in acetone, and rub it on your plastic piece, and no residue is left on the towel, then he piece is another type of plastic.
    Thanks. I dipped a thin strip of what I thought was ABS, and it didn't seem to have been affected.

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  • romanster
    replied
    I made some shavings by drilling an ABS pipe elbow and dissolved them in acetone to fill some gaps for a custom Vauxhall grille. Same process worked by dissolving into ABS cement for a thicker consistency, but the other compounds in the cement reacted with the paint primer. Safer with pure acetone, mix shavings until the right consistency.

    Satrya if you dip a paper towel in acetone, and rub it on your plastic piece, and no residue is left on the towel, then he piece is another type of plastic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fallenangel
    replied
    Crumble some styrofoam into acetone and you should have liquaid plastic after 24 hours, maybe it will help you fill the gaps. It should work in theory. Many people said it works.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    I had read that acetone can dissolve ABS plastic. The glass jar was supposed to hold the dissolved ABS solution for pasting onto the gaps.


    Either the concentration of the acetone is insufficient, or what I thought was ABS plastic is quite far from it. The "ABS"'s surface only gets wet from the acetone, but there was no other noticeable change in appearance or stiffness.

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