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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • satrya
    replied
    More acrylic adhesive

    With the lip glued to the acrylic tube, the DRL assembly slips in through the 2nd shroud's opening from the front (bottom in this picture) to the back (top in this picture). Then, the c-ring clamps and constrains the DRL assembly onto the shroud as shown:


    Apply acrylic adhesive between the c-ring and the acrylic tube of the DRL assembly:



    And wait.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Revisiting the cabochon lens to hide the faceted diffuser

    Previously, there is an option I liked that is unfeasible because the resulting LED assembly doesn't clear the 7" lens, as shown on the left, as opposed to the one on the right:

    The presence of the cabochon lens made the output appear bigger, like so:


    The clearance deficiency translates to trimming off about half a centimeter height from the already trimmed cabochon lens. The one on the left shows the portion to be trimmed off. The rest that remains is covered in blue tape.


    I realize manual cutting won't result in a clean cut, but it's worth a try. I added a block of wood on one end to minimize the saw from pivoting away. The lens is held in place on the vise grip. Hack away.


    On the left: lens after trimming. On the right: after trimming & wet sanding (500 grit, then 1000 grit, then 1200 grit):


    The left shows the 3 groups that make up the assembly. From left to right: faceted diffuser and custom acrylic frame; trimmed cabochon lens; housing with aluminum wall and acrylic trim ring / lip. The one on the right shows the assembled version. The trimmed bottom of the cabochon lens is not perfectly clear. This should be ok as the goal is to have a diffuse output.


    Mock placement without the 7" lens:


    And it clears the lens:

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Gluing this and that (mostly acrylic pieces)

    Small progress. It takes time to take care not to have glue flowing around. The acrylic adhesive is not very viscous (i.e. it is very runny) when it comes out of the tube.

    Gluing the new trim ring (right) to the rest of the faceted diffuser assembly (left) with this acrylic adhesive:


    In spite of the wetsanding to frost the ring's surface, there are areas where the back of the ring + the clear adhesive makes an optically clear enough contact to appear like splotches when seen from above. This is akin to the method of putting clear tape on frosted glass windows to better see what's behind.


    Spray painting the trim ring with frosted glass spray paint help alleviate the blemish a little:


    Might as well glue the acrylic piece that goes around the white lens holder. The white lens holder is not acrylic; my guess is it is some Polyethylene. I hope the acrylic adhesive works ok on it. I also used it to fill the gap between the acrylic piece and aluminum wall on the diffuser assembly (also shown):


    The adhesive gives off quite a strong smell as it cures. Good to have this done in a well ventilated space, and leave it to cure for at least a few hours; or maybe one full day.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    May I suggest just scoring the surface of the inner circle with a hole saw so you can locate it later, then drilling the larger one out, and then going back and drilling out the inner hole?
    That's a great idea. Thanks.

    I was hoping that the centering drill gave me enough precision to stay concentric. But apparently, it wasn't good enough for this application. I bought this 20-piece hole-saw kit for US$8 years ago; I guess I shouldn't have expected it to be a precision instrument. I'm sure the centering drill would have been sufficient on a quality hole-saw set.

    I ended up eyeballing the concentricity. As you can see, for making 2 successful rings, a 33% yield loss isn't too bad. If I need to make more, I'd have to use a method like you described. Or get a higher quality hole saw.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Lens clearance check: it fits!

    Mock tape mounting of the lip onto the acrylic tube (that holds the faceted diffuser)...

    And it clears the 7" glass lens




    Mounting the diffuser assembly on the shroud makes it easier to replace the LED should it later fail.




    Aesthetically, the exposed transition around the faceted diffuser needs some more thinking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fstrsn
    replied
    May I suggest just scoring the surface of the inner circle with a hole saw so you can locate it later, then drilling the larger one out, and then going back and drilling out the inner hole?

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Adding a smoothed filet on the ID

    For aesthetics, I decided to add a smoothed filet on the inner diameter. A bit of wetsanding does the job. Left: first try (reject); middle: frosted surface by wetsanding; right: smoothed fillet + frosted surface by wetsanding.


    The smoothed filet makes the piece look more pleasing imho.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Fabricating a lip for the acrylic tube that holds the faceted diffuser

    Since the assembly that holds the faceted diffuser is relatively light, it may be ok to mount it onto the 2nd shroud (with the staggered 3 hexagons). The c-ring idea was too tall, so another option is to fabricate an acrylic lip that will be glued onto the acrylic tube. Since this is acrylic on acrylic, I figured an acrylic specific adhesive may be able to keep them together without any worries of the adhesive failing later on.

    I used a 12'x12' random clear acrylic slab purchased from a local Tap Plastics store (@ 50 cents). It needs an inner diameter that is no bigger than the inner diameter of the acrylic tube, and an outer diameter that is slightly larger than the hole in the 2nd shroud.


    Since the lip is designed to be in contact with the cross section of the tube instead of the sidewall of the tube, it may be able to clear the 7" glass lens. I used hole cutters to cut the outer and inner holes. Unfortunately, even with a centering drill, it is challenging to make the holes concentric. The one on the left is my first try. The one on the right is from a second try, and wetsanded to frost the surface. The old c-ring is seen on the upper left.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Plan B2

    Another option is to use just the faceted diffuser, and do away without the clear cabochon lens in front of it. This solves the space clearance issue, but exposes the smaller faceted diffuser.

    One way to make the size not look noticeably small compared to the other lenses is to recess it as far inwards as possible. It gives a deep socket look that is different from the rest though:


    Left side is still my preferred (but infeasible) configuration of the clear cabochon in front of the faceted diffuser. Right side is just the faceted diffuser, placed as far back as possible.


    Lit up:


    Underexposed shots, to better see the relative intensity from different angles:




    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    But how does it light up?

    Left side (of the picture) is my preferred (but will not fit) configuration of acrylic cabochon lens on top of a faceted diffuser on top of the LED emitter. Right side is the flat LED diffuser on top of the LED emitter.


    Low exposure pictures to compare; head on:


    From the flat diffuser side:


    From the preferred configuration's side:


    Both seem to maintain about the same intensity when viewed from left side, head on, and right side. But the flat diffuser gives away the relatively spot light source behind it, whereas the preferred configuration appears like an evenly lit circle.

    The recessed (relative to the shroud) flat diffuser looks ok, even though it lacks the curved outer surface of the others (ES300, Micro DE, turn signal).

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Plan B

    Evaluating options.

    There's this LED diffuser that uses a ribbed pattern, and has a larger diameter than the faceted diffuser. I've avoided using it because I only have 1 part left, and ordering a set (of 5) takes a while from deal extreme. Also, this lens has a flat outer surface, which makes it look different from the other units in the 7" housing (i.e. the ES300, Micro DE, and DIY aux turn signal).

    Clearance wise, this LED diffuser should work:




    Lots of clearance:

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Looks like the space constraint on the aux DRL is more severe; to clear the 7" glass lens, the acrylic cabochon lens for the DRL needs to be recessed quite deep into the DRL assembly like so:


    In addition, there isn't much vertical space for the c-ring under the shroud (pointed to by the pen below) near the edge of the 7" housing.


    The shroud should push the c-ring down, but the clearance with the 7" housing edge (below) becomes an issue.


    To make matters worse, having the acrylic cabochon lens recessed to clear the 7" lens means that the faceted diffuser won't have enough space.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Ignoring for the moment, the fact that the double c-ring approach interferes with the 7" housing's lens, here's how the faceted diffuser looks, when the custom acrylic ring keeps the diffuser and the DRL assembly together via mechanical friction (i.e. I haven't applied any glue yet).







    Since the diffuser sits behind the cabochon lens, the pattern doesn't show up when seen from the side.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Affixing the diffuser's frame

    Now that the ring idea could possibly not work (due to interference with the 7" housing lens), let's move on to something else.

    One option for affixing the diffuser's frame (i.e. that white plastic ring) onto the flat side of the cabochon lens was to just glue it. But it involves a relatively contact surface area on the white plastic.


    One way to make that surface area larger is to use the side. Since I have some spare clear acrylic slabs, I'm trying out an acrylic ring made of the slab, so that the surface of the hole can be glued to more of the white plastic's surface, and then the bottom of the acrylic ring can be glued to the flat portion of the cabochon lens. More surface area means less chance of the glue failing imho. Trim the slab into a ring shape using a drum sander:


    The rings turn out like so; not perfect circles on the outer diameter.


    Another side benefit is that the outer diameter forms an interference fit with the metal surround; I may also glue it there, or just leave it to mechanical friction:

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    Very interesting. Will that clear the housing lens?
    You're correct. I need about 2mm more clearance.

    Leave a comment:

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