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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • satrya
    replied
    2 pin cousin of the AMP connector used for H1 rebased bulbs

    I bought these 2 pin cousin of the AMP connector used for H1 rebased bulbs:


    The connectors didn't come with any instructions. I documented how they should be put together here:
    http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/show...P-connector%29

    Those are used to connect the aux turn signal and aux DRL. The aux turn signal taps an existing turn signal wiring that normally go to the headlights. The aux DRL connects to an existing wiring harness I made for a pair of PIAA 35W halogen DRL. Now that the 35W HID low beams substitute the oem 55W/65W halogen low/high beams, having a 35W draw for DRL seem a bit excessive. The LED DRLs are probably at 5W each side.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Glass lens on

    Putting the 7" glass lens on, hoping that the 3 shroud pieces stay put as suggested by the free body diagram a few posts back, and hoping that the 4 light sources don't interfere with the 7" lens.



    And no surprises. The 3rd shroud tucks in, pushes the 2nd piece (covering the aux turn, aux DRL, and Hella Micro DE) up, holding the 1st piece (covering the ES300) in place. More pictures from different angles. The dichroic film strips on the 3rd piece and on the inner rim of the aux turn signal gives off different colors depending on the ambient lighting direction and where you view it from. It doesn't look terribly distracting in person.




    A good 1/2 inch around the 7" glass lens will not be visible once the fog trim is placed in front of the foglight housing, so the amount of "turbine blade" exposed to plain view will be quite smaller. Also, the bent edge of the aux DRL's hexagon won't be visible.

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    We'll see.
    There's nothing to trim though. The 3rd shroud will line up when the glass lens holds it in place (per the free body diagram).
    Ah, from the pics it looked like the 3rd shroud needed to be trimmed back to clear the lens, but it just may be an optical illusion.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    That looks like it could work. Although I'm withholding final judgement until I see it trimmed and the glass lens placed on top.
    We'll see.
    There's nothing to trim though. The 3rd shroud will line up when the glass lens holds it in place (per the free body diagram).

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    That looks like it could work. Although I'm withholding final judgement until I see it trimmed and the glass lens placed on top.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Medium ground

    In spite of the majority vote (all vs 0) for the most elaborate option of a progressively varying dichroic strip thickness, I ended up with the medium thickness version. I tried making it work, but the fixed width black strips just didn't work that well with the progressive thickness option imho.

    Here it is at different angles, without the 7" glass lens on; under indirect ambient sunlight:






    As a bit of context, I've always been fascinated by the visual presence of the Q45 low beam. The concept I'm adapting here is similar to how the EvoX-R on the headlights are partially obstructed on the top side, like so:

    Going back to the Q45's 6 lens surrouding a middle lens, the 4 units in this retrofit sits in the same implied layout, with the top & inner sides obstructed from view. But instead of all lenses appearing at the same plane, they are staggered like the basalt columns in the Devils Postpile National Monument:

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
    Woah, did you just go free-body diagram on me???!
    Yes. I FBD'ed HIDP
    I thought it might be interesting to point out that I decided not to use a screw, adhesive, or other means other than good-old mechanical interference to hold the 3 shroud pieces together.

    Originally posted by zippob09 View Post
    On a side note I think it's important for you to continually do "sanity" checks (as you have referred to them) to stay objective in your build. Keep looking at the big picture after every step. I can't help but think it's just so many elements.....maybe too many elements.

    I know you love doing the work involved, but don't over-work it!
    Noted; thank you. This whole retrofit started because I wanted to use Hella Micro DE halogen fogs in lieu of the oem 7" reflector fogs, but the 7" opening is too big for the Hella to sit alone in the middle. That became a challenge to fit in other aux features in that space.

    I keep in mind how recent headlight designs get somewhat more elaborate compared to older forms, while at the same time losing some of the tiny details due to the lack of fresnel pattern the headlight lens when moving to a clear lens + FF reflector or clear lens + projector.

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  • zippob09
    replied
    On a side note I think it's important for you to continually do "sanity" checks (as you have referred to them) to stay objective in your build. Keep looking at the big picture after every step. I can't help but think it's just so many elements.....maybe too many elements.

    I know you love doing the work involved, but don't over-work it!

    Leave a comment:


  • gold94corolla
    replied
    Woah, did you just go free-body diagram on me???!

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  • satrya
    replied
    Free body diagram

    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    I'd like to amend my vote to the hardest one as well. You've already made it this hard for yourself, what's a little extra work when you're so close?
    Could be the difference between a completed retro an a perpetual one...

    On an unrelated note; this is how I plan the floating shrouds are kept in place. For my 2nd headlight retro, a curved metal shroud piece was held in place by a combination of slotted fit onto the headlight housing, and a single screw keeping the shape right around the middle:


    I'm not a fan of the mole effect, but at the time that was the most reliable way of securing the curved piece in place (that I can think of).

    This time, I also wanted to use mechanical means of securing the 3 shroud pieces (instead of using a glue or pwr2wh8's magnet method). Here's how I hope the 3 separate pieces can stay in place.

    The 3rd shroud piece, whose outline is marked red, is forced to curve by the inner surface of the 7" headlight lens (yellow curve). The free body diagram of the 3rd shroud piece then sees these orange forces.


    When the 2nd shroud piece (light blue) is placed in coexistence with the 3rd shroud piece (red), there are a few areas where they are in contact with each other. One is the tubing wall around the aux DRL (dashed blue curve), and another is on the 2nd shroud's outer surface panel itself, where the 2nd shroud starts to hide behind the 3rd shroud. From the 2nd shroud's free body diagram relative to the 3rd shroud, it sees the forces marked purple.

    In general, the interaction between the 3rd & 2nd shroud pieces means that 2nd shroud is free to move upwards. Adding the 1st shroud piece (green; covers the ES300 yellow foglight) into the mix, the 1st shroud piece's free body diagram sees the green forces from the contact made with the 2nd shroud piece. In addition, it cannot move further up because of the housing itself.



    Hopefully this arrangement is enough to keep the 3 separate pieces in place, and yet be easy enough to disassemble in case I need to repair something by opening the 7" glass lens in the future. No glue breakdown or any nut-screw to loosen over time to worry about.

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  • csjoh
    replied
    I'd like to amend my vote to the hardest one as well. You've already made it this hard for yourself, what's a little extra work when you're so close?

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by that_guy318 View Post
    Can I amend my vote to the hardest one?
    I was afraid that someone may say that...


    Has this retro not been hard enough?
    Custom almost everything; fabricating fixtures & templates that will never see any more use; all the back and forth trying different things... and don't forget the paper mache. If this goes on any longer, then I might use all those arts&craft method from Michael's

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  • that_guy318
    replied
    Can I amend my vote to the hardest one?

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  • satrya
    replied
    Thanks for the suggestions

    Originally posted by that_guy318 View Post
    I'd say halfway
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    I'll go with narrow...
    Originally posted by zippob09 View Post
    Start small on one side, then increase the size as you go around.
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    ^^This. Play off of the optical illusion of these.
    1 vote for halfway, 1 vote for narrow, 2 votes for the hardest version...

    By the way, the black stripes are somewhat irreversible, because the borders have been scored into the 3rd shroud. If I sand the black paint off, the lines will still be there. If I make the dichroic stripes progressively go from thin to thick, the score marks will clash at some point...

    Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
    Wow dude this retrofit gets crazier every day haha. I hope you never finish it, what are we going to do without updates!?!?!?

    Next will be the taillights. It will be function over form, but I bet I'm going to try to put in some challenging bit to make.

    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    And with seeing how much of the fins are actually hidden by that bezel I'm taking back my former statement. With the fog bezels on there you'll see just enough to get an idea, but not enough to overwhelm the entire project.
    I hope so. That's my plan. The bezels provide an egg like opening that is about 6.5" on the longer axis, and maybe 6" on the short axis; so the "blades" won't be completely visible. But the fact that you can peek into it adds to the 3D illusion that it is part of a full circle of blades. We'll see.

    Originally posted by plumbix View Post
    I subscribed to the thread because I recognize the hard work.

    quick question: the heat causes a lot of problems in a headlight. What happens if you use all the lights for a long time?
    Keep up the good work!
    Thx. Definitely something to think about.

    The LED units have reflective coating around their cylinder housing inside to help deflect some of the heat radiation from the halogen housings. The aux turn signal units will only fire intermittently when I use the turn signal or hazards. The aux DRL will only be used for DRL.

    As for the 2 halogen foglight pairs, I don't plan to use them unless the weather necessitates it. One thing I noticed using my biXenons in the snow, is that the snow doesn't clear from the headlight lens as quickly as when I had the oem halogen low beams. Having halogen fogs during a significant snowfall will be useful, as the foglight lens is less likely to get covered with ice. At that point, I'm not worried about heat; I want that heat.

    For the rest of the time (i.e. not during inclement weather), I don't plan to use the foglights (Hella Micro DE pointed straight ahead). I might use the "cornering lights" (ES300 pointed slightly at an angle) when going through twisty roads at night. Again, at that point, heat is less of an issue.

    Having said that, I made it a point to make the housing structure out of metal (aluminum and galvanized steel) so heat can conduct away from the heat sources, and towards the aluminum skin.
    Metal frame & the reflective heat shield around the aux turn signal (next to the Hella):

    Heat conducting aluminum skin (the blue rectangle piece is a mock up of the bumper cover opening where it mounts to):

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  • plumbix
    replied
    I subscribed to the thread because I recognize the hard work.

    quick question: the heat causes a lot of problems in a headlight. What happens if you use all the lights for a long time?
    Keep up the good work!

    Leave a comment:

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