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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    Could you make a cap of some sort to attach to the screw head?
    That's possible. I was hoping for something where the screws don't have to be in that visible location, but I'm not sure where yet. If the fog trim were to be made entirely of metal, then the trim itself can have a tab shape. But I don't have the tools nor experience to form metal plates into complex shapes (other than flat or straight bends).

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  • satrya
    replied
    Setting aside the issue of splash proofing the housing and the fog trim tabs (for more brainstorming)...

    I've reserved some of the corners of the housing skin (from sheet aluminum) to jut out relative to the 7" lens.

    I wanted to keep them available for either a replacement mounting point in lieu of the extension bracket (as shown below), or additional mount to help keep the fog trim secure.


    A proper sized rubber hose can be made to snugly fit into the corner openings like so, and then trimmed off almost flush with the edge of the opening:


    Then, a long pin with ribbed texture (e.g. a long screw's thread) can be held in place by a combination of compression + friction. I may stay with the extension bracket approach, but it doesn't hurt to affix these rubber hose segments into the corner openings just in case.

    We'll see. Maybe they won't be needed. In that case, the top one can be extended as one of the breathing tubes of the housing.

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    Same reason why I avoid epoxying them. Metal and the flexible trim have quite different stiffness. If I lay fiberglass around the metal tab, it might provide some transition in terms of the stiffness, hence reduce the stress concentration (which is good). But I still have to rely on the resin to keep the fiberglass from delaminating against the flexible trim and against the metal tab.

    The way I see it, that moves it from one failure mode to another, whose probability is not necessarily smaller. Maybe I can do a finite element analysis on it, but I don't know how to properly model resin and fiberglass and the adhesion among the different materials. (not that I remember how to run an FEA tool, but that's not an impossible task)

    Barring that, the spreading of stress concentration using metal washer around screw+nut combo is my preferred method. Making them inconspicuous is the trick here. The approach I took a decade or so ago with the exposed 4 screws is what I'd like to avoid. That and making the retrofit splash resistant are the next challenges.
    Could you make a cap of some sort to attach to the screw head?

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    Why not fiberglass the metal brackets to the backside of the fog trim?
    Same reason why I avoid epoxying them. Metal and the flexible trim have quite different stiffness. If I lay fiberglass around the metal tab, it might provide some transition in terms of the stiffness, hence reduce the stress concentration (which is good). But I still have to rely on the resin to keep the fiberglass from delaminating against the flexible trim and against the metal tab.

    The way I see it, that moves it from one failure mode to another, whose probability is not necessarily smaller. Maybe I can do a finite element analysis on it, but I don't know how to properly model resin and fiberglass and the adhesion among the different materials. (not that I remember how to run an FEA tool, but that's not an impossible task)

    Barring that, the spreading of stress concentration using metal washer around screw+nut combo is my preferred method. Making them inconspicuous is the trick here. The approach I took a decade or so ago with the exposed 4 screws is what I'd like to avoid. That and making the retrofit splash resistant are the next challenges.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    I see. There's retrofit for the taillights coming up next.

    It won't be HID of course. I used to have a pair that had an aux 35W halogen reverse light, wired to the oem reverse light but with a switch. In one position, the oem reverse light (which serves to inform others of your intent to go on reverse) turns on. In another position, both the oem and the 35W aux turn on (which serves to help the driver see objects around). I plan to make a new version; maybe I'll try new tricks.


    There's an OEM foglight cover, that completely covers the foglight opening, as well as an OEM foglight mesh, that has a mesh opening to let light pass through. Both of these options use a single screw via an extension bracket, and 2 tabs on top that insert themselves into slots on the bumper cover.

    My aging foglight trim borrows exactly the same approach. A piece of galvanized steel mimics the bracket like so:


    And then, on the top of the foglight trim, are 2 metal tabs:

    , which are secured via the 4 screws like so from the back:

    , in order to take advantage of the 2 aforementioned slots:


    So, the foglight trim is mounted by first inserting the 2 tabs into the slots:

    , and then securing the bottom using the lone screw mounted onto the custom extension bracket:

    , which takes away some of the square-ness of the foglight area (excuse the 13 year old picture):


    I like metal because the amount of shear & bending stresses experienced by the 2 tabs can be great. So, I'd rather not epoxy anything that will later become the weak point or source of stress concentration because of incompatible stiffness.

    If possible, I'd rather not go with the 4 screw approach again for the 2 tabs, to reduce the amount of unintended visual features. This might sound odd given the somewhat busy look of the foglight retrofit.
    Why not fiberglass the metal brackets to the backside of the fog trim?

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    No, the foglight trim makes sense, I'm torn between wanting to see the finished result and wanting updates and new ideas being tried out
    I see. There's retrofit for the taillights coming up next.

    It won't be HID of course. I used to have a pair that had an aux 35W halogen reverse light, wired to the oem reverse light but with a switch. In one position, the oem reverse light (which serves to inform others of your intent to go on reverse) turns on. In another position, both the oem and the 35W aux turn on (which serves to help the driver see objects around). I plan to make a new version; maybe I'll try new tricks.

    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    The screws in the trim, I assume they are for securing the trim to the car? How about plastic welding or epoxying something to the back of the trim that can be secured from the back?

    ..and as I wrote that I realized that might not be possible at all... oh well
    There's an OEM foglight cover, that completely covers the foglight opening, as well as an OEM foglight mesh, that has a mesh opening to let light pass through. Both of these options use a single screw via an extension bracket, and 2 tabs on top that insert themselves into slots on the bumper cover.

    My aging foglight trim borrows exactly the same approach. A piece of galvanized steel mimics the bracket like so:


    And then, on the top of the foglight trim, are 2 metal tabs:

    , which are secured via the 4 screws like so from the back:

    , in order to take advantage of the 2 aforementioned slots:


    So, the foglight trim is mounted by first inserting the 2 tabs into the slots:

    , and then securing the bottom using the lone screw mounted onto the custom extension bracket:

    , which takes away some of the square-ness of the foglight area (excuse the 13 year old picture):


    I like metal because the amount of shear & bending stresses experienced by the 2 tabs can be great. So, I'd rather not epoxy anything that will later become the weak point or source of stress concentration because of incompatible stiffness.

    If possible, I'd rather not go with the 4 screw approach again for the 2 tabs, to reduce the amount of unintended visual features. This might sound odd given the somewhat busy look of the foglight retrofit.

    Leave a comment:


  • csjoh
    replied
    No, the foglight trim makes sense, I'm torn between wanting to see the finished result and wanting updates and new ideas being tried out

    The screws in the trim, I assume they are for securing the trim to the car? How about plastic welding or epoxying something to the back of the trim that can be secured from the back?

    ..and as I wrote that I realized that might not be possible at all... oh well

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    Okay, now I'm torn...

    How so? About whether a foglight trim makes sense? Or whether completing this retrofit makes sense?

    Leave a comment:


  • csjoh
    replied
    Okay, now I'm torn...

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    Wait, you're done all of a sudden?

    I was expecting, nay, nearly hoping this would go on for a bit longer... While I still think it's a bit busy, I'm well and truly impressed by the ingenuity and quality of the build. It'll likely look very different when installed on the car, so I'm looking forward to that bit.
    Thanks.
    Come August this year, it would be 1 year since the build started. Any longer and it won't ever finish, I think.

    It's nowhere near done though. The housing isn't properly splash proof yet. And the foglight trim around it needs to be made.

    Some context around the fog trim; the oem 7" reflector foglight sits like this:


    The rectangular opening seem at odds with the round housing, so I've had this DIY foglight trim + mesh to go with the oem fogs:


    The foglight trim has seen better days, and is slightly the wrong size for the retrofitted housing. This is because while the orientation of the retrofitted housing's lens is copied from the oem, it has to move about 1" forward to fit all those innards. Also, I want to figure out a way such that the 4 screws on top isn't there. pwr2wh8's approach using neodymium magnets is a compelling idea, but I'm not sure if using it for something outside like this is a good idea.


    I don't see the retrofit completed anytime soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by that_guy318 View Post
    I think it looks great. The only thing that seems off to me is how the one lens is partially covered by the curved piece, but I don't know that there's much that can be done about that.
    Thanks. Yes, the overlap of the aux turn signal by the 3rd (curved) piece is something I can't do much about. It was either that or not put the aux turn signal at all.

    But since the purpose of this retrofit has strayed from simply replacing the oem halogen fog reflector with the Hella Micro DE halogen fog projector, into fitting that and as many other aux functions I can , I decided to let the aux turn signal be partially obstructed. The one benefit is that the position of the curved piece right under the aux turn signal helps deflect some of the light to the correct side.

    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    In that case I would say you're getting very very close with this multi-piece shroud. Will the 3rd piece as well as the white faces be painted a different color or are they going to stay as is?

    EDIT:

    Didn't see your posts with them all sealed up.
    As you know, butyl is almost 100% reversible so I can always cut it open again if need be. The aluminum tape seal took longer, but that can be cleaned and redone too.

    I left the 3 pieces with a bare brushed aluminum face except for accent dark parts, to keep the overall color and texture combo as close as possible to the headlights. When light shines from straight ahead, and viewed from straight ahead, the brushed aluminum contrasts very nicely with the dark areas. I haven't been able to capture that properly with my camera; not blaming the camera though.

    Leave a comment:


  • csjoh
    replied
    Wait, you're done all of a sudden?

    I was expecting, nay, nearly hoping this would go on for a bit longer... While I still think it's a bit busy, I'm well and truly impressed by the ingenuity and quality of the build. It'll likely look very different when installed on the car, so I'm looking forward to that bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fstrsn
    replied
    In that case I would say you're getting very very close with this multi-piece shroud. Will the 3rd piece as well as the white faces be painted a different color or are they going to stay as is?

    EDIT:

    Didn't see your posts with them all sealed up.

    Leave a comment:


  • that_guy318
    replied
    I think it looks great. The only thing that seems off to me is how the one lens is partially covered by the curved piece, but I don't know that there's much that can be done about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Aux DRL & aux turn signal connectors wired, glass lens installed & sealed

    I had a good amount of leftover OCI butyl from my 2 headlight retrofits, so I used those:


    To prevent any exposed butyl from sticking to things, and to prevent any moisture to slowly make its way in through repeated heating & cooling cycles, I laid aluminum tape around the entire seam. They are laid in sections, and arranged like the tiles of a roof (i.e. in the order such that water flowing down will not get caught in the seams between the aluminum tape "tiles").


    The connectors are visible at the bottom of the picture.

    Leave a comment:

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