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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by that_guy318 View Post
    I'll bet a strap wrench would hold the film around the edge nicely.
    Probably. I thought of using hose clamps, but I don't have spare ones around for a 7".

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  • that_guy318
    replied
    I'll bet a strap wrench would hold the film around the edge nicely.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Leo.Nardo View Post
    OMFG you are the best of the retrofit hehehe
    Thank you. There are many others I can think of here with much better skill and attention to detail though.

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  • Leo.Nardo
    replied
    OMFG you are the best of the retrofit hehehe

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    Does this mean you're close to doing a final assembly of these?
    A few weeks ago, I've completed the wiring harnesses for the aux turn signal, aux parking lights (I don't think it is bright enough to be a DRL), and the 2 pairs of foglights. It was around the time I posted about the internals of the 2-pin AMP-type connectors.

    Next will be functional test (i.e. whether they work at all after being set aside for so long). The housings mount to the oem location using the oem screws (unless I made some error).

    After that comes foglight trim pieces. The sides of the housing will remain as bare metal to maximize heat conductivity (since those halogen fogs can get quite hot, even at the oem 55W rating), hidden behind the foglight trim.

    With any luck, the foglights and 3800K D2S bulbs will be in service this winter; not that we normally see much winter in this part of the world.

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    Since I've had reasonable success with aluminum tape as an additional seal around the butyl channels in the past, I decided to cut strips of aluminum tape and use them to keep the curved edge of the film in place.

    As before, the film is heated section by section, starting from the bottom, and moving up on the left and right side until I reach the top dead center. Along the way, the curved edge is squeegeed, and aluminum tape strip is applied to "pull" the film over the curve. As I move upwards, the aluminum tape is laid on top of another like roof tiles. My assumption is that water that manages to get here will want to gradually drip downwards due to gravity. I don't know whether the local air pressure buildup in the foglight opening will overcome this (and thus making an inverted roof pattern the way to go).

    Now the film edges follow the contour nicely.


    Does this mean you're close to doing a final assembly of these?

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Aluminum tape

    Since I've had reasonable success with aluminum tape as an additional seal around the butyl channels in the past, I decided to cut strips of aluminum tape and use them to keep the curved edge of the film in place.

    As before, the film is heated section by section, starting from the bottom, and moving up on the left and right side until I reach the top dead center. Along the way, the curved edge is squeegeed, and aluminum tape strip is applied to "pull" the film over the curve. As I move upwards, the aluminum tape is laid on top of another like roof tiles. My assumption is that water that manages to get here will want to gradually drip downwards due to gravity. I don't know whether the local air pressure buildup in the foglight opening will overcome this (and thus making an inverted roof pattern the way to go).

    Now the film edges follow the contour nicely.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Relieved to find out that with a lot of patience and dishwasher soap, the goo disappeared. I could go with the suggestions of magic eraser & citrus based cleaner next time (I hope there won't be a next time).


    The ridges on the skin that makes fingerprints are apparently abrasive enough to take the goo off after repeated soap application. I think my fingerprints are almost gone from all this goo peeling.

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  • satrya
    replied
    ^
    Sounds promising. I guess I have some options.

    Thanks

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  • csjoh
    replied
    You can use a citrus based cleaner to dissolve the glue and then just wipe it off with a soft cloth. I do that regularly (I'm a hobbyist detailer) when removing decals and stickers from both paint, glass and plastic of various kinds, including tint film, which is basically what you're working with.

    Just don't let the cleaner dry. Spray on, leave for a little while, wipe off. If it does start to dry, add more, then wipe immediately.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
    maybe you don't need the film to curve around the edge? It's just for protection, so the front surface is what matters.
    I suppose not. I installed pre-cut film on my oem foglights (this was my first ever use of the clear film protection 10+ years ago, so I didn't want to experiment with cutting my own round template), and they stop about half an inch before that.

    Before I installed a DIY fog trim cover, I didn't like how wax and dirt residue builds up on a very visible edge. Also, for the paint protection films, I get these dings just right where the protection film ends. For those reasons, I thought I could do better this time and make it wrap around the small radius curve.

    Having a lofty goal doesn't hurt; one can always fall back on what is doable.

    Originally posted by phantom240 View Post
    The eraser isn't what I would consider abrasive. It feels like a denser foam rubber. Didn't hurt my headlights at all, for what it's worth.
    Thanks. I assume your headlights are polycarbonate (i.e. plastic from oem) instead of acrylic (e.g. the material of choice when one replicates headlight lens via vacuum forming)?

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  • phantom240
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    ^
    Thanks. Would the clear headlight film respond well to Magic Eraser's abrasive surface though? (I don't know)
    The eraser isn't what I would consider abrasive. It feels like a denser foam rubber. Didn't hurt my headlights at all, for what it's worth.

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  • gold94corolla
    replied
    maybe you don't need the film to curve around the edge? It's just for protection, so the front surface is what matters.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    ^
    Thanks. Would the clear headlight film respond well to Magic Eraser's abrasive surface though? (I don't know)

    Leave a comment:


  • phantom240
    replied
    Originally posted by satrya View Post
    ^
    Well, the electrical tape not staying long enough to curve the film's edges may not be a lost cause; I can try some other means, or if all else fails, just trim the film to a shape that most pre-cut films do. Pre-cut films typically don't go that far, so if that's a fallback position, I'm no worse off than using pre-cut films.

    But the other thing is that goo. I hope it can be removed with enough patience.

    Live and learn I suppose.
    I can tell you from experience with butyl on my headlight lenses that a Mr Clean Magic Eraser and Dawn works quite well.

    Leave a comment:

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