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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Lol, well that's convenient.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    As always, in for updates. Where did you get that trim piece though?
    Hardware store; they apparently custom made one for my year model

    It looks like this in the orientation it is designed for:


    They come either in galvanized steel (or maybe aluminum) or ABS plastic. The angle it makes is almost identical to the angle the oem foglight lens makes with respect to the bumper cover (as shown in the picture below). It was quite an amusing discovery.



    The true top side has a granular texture, but the other side is nicely very smooth, save for some injection molding artifacts.

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    As always, in for updates. Where did you get that trim piece though?

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  • satrya
    replied
    Since the trim piece needs to span the edge of the bumper cover, what used to be a flat surface needs to be curved. Some heat forming (lowest heat setting in my heat gun) takes care of that nicely. This will be an iterative process of heat, bend, and check (onto the actual bumper cover).


    To prevent trimming off too much material, I decided to replicate the curved piece with the trusty paper mache method. The idea is to do fine trimming on the paper mache so that the final shape can be decided. 1 part all-purpose flour, 4 parts water, boiled, with a pinch of salt (to inhibit bacterial growth).

    As with other parts of this project, overtrimming the paper mache can easily be remedied by taping new material, as long as the overtrim wasn't excessive. That way, I don't have to get a new plastic piece altogether and re-match the curve.


    Wait for the paper mache to cure.

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  • satrya
    replied
    The old DIY foglight trim piece sat inside the bumper cover opening like so:


    With the new 7" housing's glass lens being at least 1" further forward, that piece doesn't really fit. Instead, the new piece needs to push a bit forward and possibly wrap around the edge like so:


    That cardboard mock up doesn't curve very well, but that's the general idea I'm currently considering. The piece might extend further inwards into the lower center opening, and modify the angle of the lower center opening to add a slight tilt. But that will obscure the tow hook cover.

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  • satrya
    replied
    3W LED

    And now just the 3W LED. Like the fogs, it is wired so that it can only be used when the oem light switch is not in the "off" position. Hence the 3 amber LEDs and amber sidemarkers are also on.


    I've been using the squirrel finder addition in the Mini D2S as some form of DRL. Broad daylight test from across a local street; the 3W LED doesn't stand out more than the Mini D2RL. But it adds conspicuity imho.


    For future reference, perhaps three to seven of those 3W LEDs (each side) can serve as DRL. Maybe it is also the color; blueish white in broad daylight seem to get drowned out.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Both (upper: ES300, yellow lens version; lower: Hella Micro DE, foglight version) foglights on. The bulbs are regular 55W halogen H3. OEM headlight switch is at the city light / parking light position (that one position before "Low"). This lights up the 3 LEDs in the headlight and the sidemarkers.


    Now with the low beams on, quad mode (top:Mini D2S 2.0, 3Five 4300K bulbs still warming up, 3Five ballasts; bottom: EvoX-R, 85122, Matsushita Gen V), plus the fogs, quad mode.


    I was hoping that the placement of the ES and DE could mirror the relative roll angle of the Mini and Evo, but this is the max roll I can get in order for them to fit into the opening.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by phantom240 View Post
    Ah. I wasn't aware the main turn signal was still incandescent.
    Yes. Price-vs-output wise, I'm sticking to incandescent amber turn signal bulbs for now.

    The aux turn signal doesn't have the same beam pattern, even though I've already added a diffuser ahead of it. The intensity is very good from the oncoming traffic's pov.

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  • phantom240
    replied
    Ah. I wasn't aware the main turn signal was still incandescent.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    So they don't blink all at the same time, but like they do in the gif? It's definitely different and sure to grab attention, though.
    Originally posted by phantom240 View Post
    I'm not sure if I like the lack of a synchronous or wig wag timing...
    Wiring wise, the main and aux turn signals blink at the same time. The variation is in how the sidemarker behaves; it either blinks in unison with the main (and aux), or alternating with them.

    The animated gif is taken from 3 frames of a multiple frame shot, and are not spaced that uniformly in time. Since the aux turn signal uses LED while the main uses incandescent bulb, the LED lights up first (due to the faster response time). Interestingly, the difference between the decay response profiles of the incandescent bulb and the LED's as power is cut off from them, as seen in the animated gif , looks like the LED stays on longer.

    This combination makes it seem that all 3 (main, aux, and sidemarker) blink with some syncopation. If the 3 were mounted in a single line, it can appear as if they light up in sequence: aux then main then sidemarker. That wasn't the intent of the wiring/design.

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  • phantom240
    replied
    I'm not sure if I like the lack of a synchronous or wig wag timing...

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  • csjoh
    replied
    So they don't blink all at the same time, but like they do in the gif? It's definitely different and sure to grab attention, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • satrya
    replied
    Aux turn signal test

    Now to test the aux turn signal. I had previously modified the sidemarker (i.e. the amber piece on the fender next to the headlight) to blink in unison when the headlights are off (i.e. no parking nor low nor high), and blink alternatively when the headlights are on.

    The aux turn signal is wired in parallel with the main turn signal in the headlights. In the event that the main turn signal bulb needs replacement, the aux turn signal will provide something somewhat usable until a replacement can be made... I have spare bulbs in the trunk, but I can't assume I can always find out that the bulb is out and pull over to replace it right away.

    Here's how it looks like when both are at their maximum intensity, more or less...


    A little animated gif; the timing presented by this animated gif is much faster than the real timing.

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  • satrya
    replied
    ^
    Yes. True. If I had enough.

    As it stands now, I'm relying on the aluminum tape to provide the permanent role of preventing water to enter any gap between the glass lens and the film's edge. In addition, it helps keep the film's edge curved. I will need to monitor it for several days to see if any of the edges peel off or not (hopefully not).

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  • that_guy318
    replied
    You could always connect a couple together.

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