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7" retrofit (GDAA WRX)

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  • satrya
    replied
    Thread for the screw

    Instead of using a tool to create a thread in the holes of the metal bracket, I decided to go the easy route of using speed nuts. They're flat sheet metal with a "catcher" feature on the hole to latch on to a screw's thread:


    I've used speed nuts to hold together DIY mudflaps on the fender; they can be quite reliable in fastening screws. It also means my metal bracket doesn't need to be thick enough to have a few pitches of thread.

    The speed nut mounts to the metal bracket like so:

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by MGMTF View Post
    Pics??
    Well. By finished I don't mean the whole retrofit is finished. Just that both sides are no longer flat.

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  • MGMTF
    replied
    Pics??

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Bitter View Post
    Or just bend some aluminum flat stock to a shape to help pushing and shaping the hot plastic like a spoon of sorts.
    Spoon is a good idea. Maybe something like a soup serving spoon.

    Too late now. I finished both sides.

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  • Bitter
    replied
    Or just bend some aluminum flat stock to a shape to help pushing and shaping the hot plastic like a spoon of sorts.

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by csjoh View Post
    Because then it's likely to melt?
    The plastic or the fingertips?

    Originally posted by Bitter View Post
    Why not make a forming tool so you don't burn your fingers? Some kind of metal shape that you can use to equally form both sides with.
    But I will need to make a mold to form the metal in the first place; maybe out of wood, carve the shape, put the carved wood into packed sand, heat metal, pour the molten metal into the cavity of the sand formed by the wood mold, split the sandbox, take out the metal piece, grind to smooth out the surface, ...

    Seems like a complicated process for the sake of making 2 pieces.

    Not to say that it's impossible.

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  • Bitter
    replied
    Why not make a forming tool so you don't burn your fingers? Some kind of metal shape that you can use to equally form both sides with.

    Leave a comment:


  • csjoh
    replied
    Because then it's likely to melt?

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Ilikecars View Post
    Why not heat it more? Make it easier
    Originally posted by phantom240 View Post
    Because that hurts the fingers more. Also, it may damage the plastic.
    Originally posted by Fstrsn View Post
    My thoughts exactly. Better to go at a longer temp and take longer than risk damaging the shroud beyond repair.
    Yes to all. I'm using the lower setting of my heatgun, and even then, the ABS plastic can start bubbling and deforming if it gets too much heat.

    Plus the heat resistant gloves can only insulate so much.

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  • Fstrsn
    replied
    Originally posted by phantom240 View Post
    Because that hurts the fingers more. Also, it may damage the plastic.
    My thoughts exactly. Better to go at a longer temp and take longer than risk damaging the shroud beyond repair.

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  • phantom240
    replied
    Because that hurts the fingers more. Also, it may damage the plastic.

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  • Ilikecars
    replied
    Why not heat it more? Make it easier

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  • satrya
    replied
    Originally posted by Ilikecars View Post
    Good luck lol
    Thanks. Fortunately, this step only requires patience and some time to let the sore fingertips rest (from pushing the heated plastic piece in order to form concave profiles).

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  • Ilikecars
    replied
    Good luck lol

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  • satrya
    replied
    Heat gun 3D shaping time

    Since I decided against wrapping the black plastic piece around the corner of the bumper cover, the overall shape of the piece is much closer to my original version from 10+ years ago.

    I wanted to add more contour to the piece. Heat gun 3D shaping time. Having heat (& tear) resistant Kevlar gloves is a good idea. Start with the outer bottom corner. First 15-30 minutes yields a subtle rounding on that corner:


    Another half hour working in that area deepens the 3D contour there:


    Moving up on the outer corner:


    A bit more (hard to see the difference other than the sore fingertips)...


    Getting the outer, almost vertical corner, to match the existing opening's curvature takes a lot of heat-bend-wait repetition


    At this point, the black plastic piece is held by the 2 tabs on top and rests on the floor of the bumper cover opening.

    Next up, the driver side...

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