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Junyan headlights + Morimoto Mini on bugeye impreza (version 1)

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  • Junyan headlights + Morimoto Mini on bugeye impreza (version 1)

    This was my first retrofit to replace the 10+ yr old fractured oem headlight housing. The basic parts were:
    1. Junyan aftermarket headlights (comes with Halogen H1 low beam projectors, Halogen H1 high beam free-form reflectors, 3 city light LEDs, and 2 parking light halo LEDs)
    2. Morimoto Mini D2S (complete set from TRS with ballast & Morimoto 4300k capsules)
    3. Hella Optilux H3 projector fogs (for backroad / cornering lights)
    4. Projector-style cover for the turn signal bulbs (from Tap Plastics store)

    I learned a lot from this first attempt. Any feedback/tips/lesson from the veterans here are welcome. (I've been working on version 2 now).



    For those of you not familiar with the "bugeye" subaru impreza, here's how the oem headlights look like for most model trims. Hence... bugeye..
    Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

    3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

  • #2
    This is the version of the Junyan I started with. They sell them in chrome (like this one), flat black, piano black, and possibly other variations. I chose chrome because I wanted to make it look as oem as possible.


    While the fit and finish (especially with respect to the car frame's mounting points and gaps relative to body panels) are better than some other aftermarket bugeye impreza headlights I've tried before, there are a few things that I'm not a big fan of:
    • Poor low beam pattern. See LD900's thread, post #33. These will be replaced with Morimoto Mini D2S
    • Exposed high beam bulbs, not to mention poor high beam pattern as well (posted in a Subaru forum). These will make way for cornering lights.
    • Exposed turn signal bulbs. These will be covered by projector-style housing.
    • Exposed city light LEDs. Frosting the headlight housing takes care of that.
    • Halo LEDs. I simply leave it alone and not power them.
    Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

    3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

    Comment


    • #3
      Looking forward to seeing more details!

      Comment


      • #4
        Why bother with all those negative points?
        I wanted a headlight housing that didn't start out with reflector optics. That way, there won't be any leftover low beam reflector once completed. That means the common reflector opening mount method doesn't apply very well.

        However, the Junyan housing comes with yaw and pitch adjustment screws. It turns out, a few adaptor brackets make them compatible with the Mini D2S mounting points. Here's how the inside of the housing looks like, with the high beam alignment tied to that of the low beam's via this cantilever sheet metal. That won't work if the high beam is replaced by something bigger/heavier.


        Here's a closeup of the low+high beam cantilever. One of the black plastic threads around the low beam for the yaw and pitch adjustment can be seen at the bottom of this picture. There is another one (out of focus) at the top and farthest end of the low beam projector. The top but closer end of the low beam projector shows a hollow rectangle. Basically, the 2 black plastic threads mount to rectangular holes of this size.
        Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

        3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
          Looking forward to seeing more details!
          Thank you.

          Here's an image I also posted in one of LD900's post regarding Junyan headlights (for a VW), which compares the Junyan low beam H1 halogen projectors to the Mini D2S. Both sport a ~2.5" ish lens. Being the first time doing a retrofit, I didn't bother comparing the focal length and other details. All I know is that when eyeballing for the H1 filament from the outside (looking through the lens), the Junyan's suggest a spot beam pattern through the center line, and 1 fainter spot beam on each horizontal sides of the projector; something like a trident. I don't know whether a lens swap (with different focal length) can dramatically improve the reflector-projector beam dispersion. Something to consider in the future (since I still have the Junyan units).


          One obvious issue here is that none of the Mini D2S's holes match the location of the black threaded plastic pieces. The good news is that the Mini D2S's overall width and height is less than the Junyan's, so making "extension" brackets is not out of the question.

          Another obvious difference is that the distance between the "mounting plane" (where the mounting points are) and the lens is shallower on the Mini. This is not a bad thing, because the custom extension bracket will simply have to "push" the Minis a bit forward.

          Below is a closeup of one of the black threaded plastic pieces (I'm going to call it BTPP from now).
          The attachment of BTPP to the mounting plane is no different than most automotive plastic fastener clips, which means that you can snap insert it, and squeeze the tips with a pair of pliers to remove.
          Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

          3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

          Comment


          • #6
            Can the bracket fit?

            Taking the lens out and covering the reflector bowl for protection, here's the Mini's mounting plane relative to the 2 Junyan adjustment screws. With a little bit of eyeballing, it looks like pushing the Mini's bottom mounting point through the only bottom Junyan screw would work. The other one is slightly visible, at the diagonal opposite of the Mini's mounting plane, just next to the 2 holes not covered by blue masking tape. The Mini's bottom (threaded) hole needs to be enlarged a little bit. The threads will be replaced by one of the Junyan's BTPP.


            Here's where the top adjuster screw lines up against the upper side of the Mini's mounting plane. Looks like a simple "U" shaped bracket with 3 holes can affix the top part of the Mini to this adjuster.
            Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

            3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

            Comment


            • #7
              The 3rd mounting point: ball joint.

              The 3rd of the Junyan adjusting/mounting point is a ball joint with a rectangular end that fits the same rectangular hole used by the 2 BTPP. With a bit of bending, you can align it so that it also sits next to 2 Mini mounting holes like so: (the Mini is floating in this picture, held in position by the bottom screw and the "clamping" action of the white ball joint piece)


              In order for the ball jointed piece to mount better, a diagonal groove has to be filed off of the back side of the Mini's mounting plane. It may be a bit difficult to discern from the picture below. The bottom-most hole in this picture is shaved off about halfway along the centerline of the projector.
              Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

              3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

              Comment


              • #8
                Brackets

                For the brackets, I chose galvanized steel readily available from hardware stores. I chose this "Simpson Strong Ties" series for reinforcing wood structures because they offer a good balance of rigidity and weight, plus they have random holes that could be used for various portions of the brackets. They also happen to be thin enough for me to drill or use metal shears.

                First up is the bottom BTPP bracket. Note that instead of the original orientation of the BTPP, the Mini adaptation points them in the opposite direction. The picture below shows the conceptual location of the BTPP relative to the back side of the Mini's mounting plane. They will line up so that the Junyan's bottom screw goes through the BTPP and one of the Mini's holes. The sheet metal has some conceptual cut and fold lines here. Imagine cutting and folding the sheet metal and "wrapping" it around both the BTPP and the mounting plane.


                Like so:
                Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                Comment


                • #9
                  2nd bracket

                  For the ball jointed piece, I found a Simpson Strong Tie that has an almost perfect hole (one less drilling, means one less source of alignment error). It goes in like so:


                  Taking the orientation shown in the picture above, and imagine making two 90 degree folds (vertical fold mark) out of your monitor (towards you), rounding non critical edges, and you get the following:

                  Two holes need to be drilled on one side, for the 2 mounting holes as dictated by the Mini's mounting plane. At this point, the remaining upper screw is slightly touching the Mini's mounting plane, but is not yet affixed to it.
                  Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                  3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Repeating the same rough idea, the last mounting point can be secured like so:


                    Because the Hella Optiluxes were intended for backroads side lighting only, I didn't worry too much about yaw adjustment. Instead, I mounted it for pitch adjustment. I lined up the horizontal before drilling the 2 mounting holes to horizontal level cues from the Junyan housing. (Since it was injection molded ABS, there were some hints of flashing that goes along horizontal and vertical lines in the back side; my guess is that their CAD design assumes level plane as the reference). For retrofit veterans, there are probably many reasons why this mounting technique is far from ideal, even for off-road-use-only. (hence the ongoing version 2). Because I was a little concerned about heat dissipation from the Optilux' 55W H3 halogen bulb, I added a thin metal sleeve, hoping that enough heat would travel out from the Optilux' metal housing, through the mounting screws, and out to ambient.
                    Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                    3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Turn signal

                      Since both low & high beam spots are replaced by projectors, I thought it might blend in better if the turn signal is covered by a projector-ish housing. A trip to a local Tap Plastics store reveals a few acrylic cabochons (those half sphere lenses instead of the parabolic-ish real projector lenses).

                      Knowing that convex lenses will affect light dispersion, I tried to place the cabochons as close to the turn filament as possible, but still leave some air gap for cooling between power cycles. To complete the housing, two interference fit acrylic tubes make the body of the housing, and a thin aluminum sheet makes the trim around the lens. The smaller diameter tube allows the cabochon to be glue mounted to the bigger tube. The aluminum hides some of the glue blemishes from plain view. Since the housing is acrylic, the reflectors around the Junyan shroud still functions to a great extent.


                      Here's how it looks like mounted to the Junyan shroud. The shroud is a one piece that includes the turn reflector.
                      Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                      3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Those brackets you are making are pretty awesome.
                        Originally posted by pro5x2
                        It was like, "Oh hia, let me help you see little halogens"
                        Epic.



                        My FX-R Retrofit: http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=53754

                        Originally posted by sbdrumr
                        If your projectors are mounted upside down simply rotate the car 180° and your problems are solved

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          a little insurance: headlight protection film

                          For a little insurance of the HID investment; a 40mil headlight protection film. Imho, this kind of film is the reason why my OEM headlights have survived this long, in spite of heavy object impacts (rocks from gravel construction trucks etc.) over it's 10+ years. Sorry for the poor color balance; it's actually a clear film, not "GT yellow" .

                          Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                          3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 93blkongreenpro View Post
                            Those brackets you are making are pretty awesome.
                            Thank you.

                            For the back, I relied on the caps that came with the Junyan units. An "L" slot allows for the ballast connector to go through. A bit sloppy, but it was the best I could come up with at the time. I didn't want to wait for new parts (say, rubber end caps that TRS sells) to solve the problem.

                            Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                            3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The biggest challenge I encountered was in the wiring. It was only later on that I found posts where other bugeye owners are not getting their low & highs operate the proper way. TRS sent me an older version (this is prior to the latest ballast announced February 2012-ish) on the right, and I returned the newer one on the left that I had little luck with.


                              That and a pin swap (see below) gave the bugeye a pair of properly working biXenons.
                              Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                              3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                              Comment

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