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Modding Ford fusion fogs for more foreground?

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  • Modding Ford fusion fogs for more foreground?

    Hi guys,

    I have a pair of fusion fogs on my scion xb, i mainly wanted the fogs for more width and foreground lighting when it's raining or bad weather. I've been reading on how you can mod it by removing the top shield, I searched and found a old thread where someone modded them and increased the intensity.

    My question is this worthwhile? I have xb35 4300k bulbs morimoto 35 dsp ballasts, don't care for the ballasts since the warm up time is so slow but I'm dealing with it.

    What I'm trying to accomplish is moving the cutoff for the fogs just underneath the main projector but keeping the foreground for inclement weather.

    What do you guys think? Also another thing was, I found a thread where someone had a nice blue band, mine just has a nice yellowish red band. Not that it matters but just wanted to make sure they're mounted up right

  • #2
    Too much foreground means more light will bounce off the road and up oncoming drivers. It will also limit how far you can see, as more things right in front swamps the visibility of everything else.

    Having said that, if the bulb is tilted slightly up, I believe the hotspot can move lower to create the brighter foreground. Don't move it too far, as the bowl may get burnt faster.
    Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

    3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

    Comment


    • #3
      Currently
      Originally posted by satrya View Post
      Too much foreground means more light will bounce off the road and up oncoming drivers. It will also limit how far you can see, as more things right in front swamps the visibility of everything else.

      Having said that, if the bulb is tilted slightly up, I believe the hotspot can move lower to create the brighter foreground. Don't move it too far, as the bowl may get burnt faster.
      Well, I mainly would be using these lights when it's bad weather or raining on a dark night where the road is absorbing most of the light anyways so I think that it wouldn't blind oncoming drivers if aimed right as well?

      I have just stock non afs rx330 projectors with clear lens paired with Philips d2s xtreme vision driven by mats Gen 4s, I do wished they were brighter in the city and especially when it was raining but that's why I have the fogs.

      What do you mean by the bulb being tilted too high? I didn't modify the way they sit, it's just an h11 setup where I just twisted them in and left them

      Comment


      • #4
        When it rains, the road doesn't really absorb light. What is happening, is that the amount of light scattered in all directions (in the sense of a ray of light bouncing off a matte surface spreads at different angles, including a fraction back to the source) will decrease, and the amount of light reflected (in a mirror sense) will increase. What this means, is that objects become less visible (since the amount of scattered light from the object ahead decreases), and the road glares from others' light on the road (due to reflection).

        You can increase the amount of light returning to you from objects ahead, by increasing the overall intensity, which means that for every gain in visibility from the scatter, you increase that much more to others' glare. The same goes to your eyes getting glare from others' light.

        That is probably one of the major reasons why most foglights max out at 55W halogen, while there are auxiliary driving lights with 100W halogen.

        What I meant by tilting the bulb, is that it alters the beam pattern to increase foreground. So I would say that it may be the easiest way to modify your projector to give out more foreground.
        Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

        3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

        Comment


        • #5
          if you increase foreground you will loose its fog part of usability

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          • #6
            Well put then won't be doing that now, Do you guys recommend me going to a more yellower color for the rain/fog?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jac┐ View Post
              Well put then won't be doing that now, Do you guys recommend me going to a more yellower color for the rain/fog?
              Perhaps.

              First order of business is to get foglights with a good beam pattern. Since I don't have the proper equipment nor information on how to evaluate foglights, I prefer to go with something like the Hella Micro DE (halogen projector type; they also have an auxiliary driving light type with a similar form factor), or the IS300 / ES projectors.

              The Micro DE on regular halogen bulbs emit a regular low beam halogen color, so it is not as yellow as say, an IS/ES fog with yellow lens. But I would rather pick the Micro DE than some random foglight with yellow output.

              If you have a good foglight, then all else being equal, I believe having an output color that is different enough from other light source and the color of the glowing haze (e.g. due to snowfall, rain, or fog) makes sense, because as the foglight output hits objects ahead and bounces back to your eyes, the color will be different enough so the objects can stand out a little better. I believe this is the case with red brake lights (and red backwards facing foglights).

              But since foglights are limited to a certain range of color (from "white" to "yellow"), yellow is the max we can go with.

              Upper inner sides: ES300 (yellow lens version). Lower outer sides: Hella Micro DE halogen fogs.
              Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

              3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

              Comment


              • #8
                That's an insane setup! So should I ditch the hid kit in the fogs and go back to the h11 halogens?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't have fusion fogs and have never tried it first hand. But the pictures posted in this forum seem to suggest a nice concentration on the horizontal area near the cutoff. If I were to use one for inclement weather, I would likely retain whatever halogen bulb it was designed for, and not replace it with a higher wattage bulb.

                  Fwiw, I believe a good foglight needs to have very minimal foreground (to prevent light reflecting from the road to increase the glow of fog/mist/snow/rain ahead), be placed quite low (again to minimize fog/mist/snow/rain ahead to be illuminated), and have a color that is as far as legally possible from grey/white.

                  One problem, is that since roads aren't flat, and vehicles may tilt upwards/downwards with changing passenger/payload, a very narrow horizontal beam can completely miss its ideal aim under these real-life conditions.

                  So, for most foglights, which doesn't have an auto-leveling feature, their beam has to be made taller than what it may need to be had it been able to auto-level all the time. This means increasing foreground to some extent. Also, since people expect to observe a difference in the output when fogs are on, increasing foreground is the simplest thing to do imho.

                  Based on those arguments, I would want to see if the fusion's foreground is minimal enough or not. If not, then a simple foreground limiter would do the trick.


                  Going back to the foglight avoiding fog/mist/rain/snow from glowing; I recall a video of a low beam research work, where an object detection algorithm is used to track rain drops ahead of the low beam, and the low beam is comprised of many mini shutters that can block off any position within their "grid". As rain drops fall, the mini shutters close relevant portions, following the falling motion of the rain. As a result, you can see the object behind the rain "waterfall" better.

                  That research assumed a "sheet" of rain instead of rain extending all the way ahead of the car, so it has a long way to go to see real life application imho. Plus it probably won't work well for fog/mist. But the idea that you don't want to expend more energy to light up the road ahead, only to make these things glow more, is relevant to foglights imho.
                  Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                  3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You make some great points, I'm actually going back to halogens for the fogs actually. I don't care for how long it takes to warm up and the fact that the hid's are more appearance then function.

                    I'm debating on throwing back in the h11 bulbs that came with the fogs originally or get some h9 bulbs which are slightly brighter with a yellow cap over it?

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                    • #11
                      H11 or H9 should be ok I suppose.

                      As for the yellow cap, I thought that's supposed to be meant for reflector optics only? In other words, not designed to be in a small enclosure like a closed projector? I'm not saying that it won't work; just that I don't have prior information that it will be ok heat wise.
                      Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                      3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Definitely go with yellow bulbs, that's the only thing that ever helped me in the rain lol

                        Since you have projectors, go with HID

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
                          Definitely go with yellow bulbs, that's the only thing that ever helped me in the rain lol

                          Since you have projectors, go with HID
                          Hm. I'm somewhat ok with yellow bulbs, save the issue of many yellow bulbs that don't seem to last as long as regular (but quality) ones.

                          But I'm not sure about HID fogs for inclement weather. I sort of agree with some of Markus' points on this. (for now)
                          Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                          3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ah sorry I was talking to the other guy (OP) lol. Just going on personal experience there

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