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Is sealing headlights and tail lights an art or.....?

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  • Is sealing headlights and tail lights an art or.....?

    Just curious, cuz I bought aftermarket tail lights a while ago and they'll randomly(not always) but randomly fog up in little places and I've sealed them up like fort knox.

    Is it really that frustrating to seal headlight/tail lights or am I missing a simple concept?

  • #2
    They do need a small hole in them to let the humidity climitize in them, when they fog up its because they were made indoors where its warm, then outside the air condenses inside and has no where to go...creating the moisture inside of them, thats why I put mine outside before I do final install so they dont fog up...has worked 100% so far.

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    • #3
      I had headlights I used to have and they had "drainage holes" on them but they still fogged up.

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      • #4
        There's an aftermarket taillight for bugeye wrx that is notorious for leaks (as reported by users). I bought a pair, and for my pair, the leak stems from the fact that one of the mounting posts is too long, making the taillight not sit properly with respect to the chassis. As a result, rainwater can seep in and inundate near one of the bulb openings. I trimmed the post and did deliberate "rain" experiments, and it was actually quite weather tight.

        Something similar might happen with your set. The bulb openings can be vulnerable if water drips enough on them.
        Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

        3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

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        • #5
          Yeah I tried putting Teflon tape around the rubber seals to see if that helped a little but didn't.

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          • #6
            Use desicant packs and silicone seal it
            My Feedback
            http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=40647

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            • #7
              when resealing mine had condensation, but since here is summer and haven't rained (only like 2 times in 4 weeks). I assumed the air inside headlight had moisture. I removed the dust cap on my high beam on the night before going out of house to let moisture go out while i'm driving. Returned home had no condensation, placed dust cap again and haven't fogged up since then.
              Not an expert on the retrofiting scene at all, but hey this worked for me. Hope can help you too!

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              • #8
                So to bring up another related question so I don't have to make another thread.

                Is the part where the bulb seat and the back of the projector bowl tight enough to keep moisture out? As in, does the spring on the D2S 3.0s keep the bulb pushed down hard enough to technically create a seal against the bulb opening?

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                • #9
                  Probably not... there are still small gaps. That's what the rubber housing caps are for!

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                  • #10
                    I don't see how I am able to put a rubber cap on when I'm retrofitting a 1 piece reflector headlight. The reflector bowl is part of the housing itself, its not like newish cars that have it to where the reflector is a separate piece from the backing.

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                    • #11
                      You can create something that deflects water splash and drips from entering that gap.
                      Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                      3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

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                      • #12
                        Even then if water deflects from it humid air will enter and create condensation correct?

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                        • #13
                          I am not sure if Silica Gel or Desiccant bags might help absorb the humid air in there efficiently. I am almost done and will seal tomorrow but still fearing that problem of condensation as well...

                          Regarding the Humid air entering there, my OEM headlamps have holes near the edges and they have never had such a problem, even in rainy days. I wonder how these holes help preventing condensation

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                          • #14
                            Thats something I never understood, some headlights have "breather" holes and others don't and sometimes both don't fog up at all. Might just put dielectric grease in there or something, along with some in the plug that goes on the bulb as well.

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                            • #15
                              I put mine in the oven at 185 degrees for 20 minutes. Dry heat to remove moisture. Then put bulb in an bam. No more fog.

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