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Invisible Led Turn Signal Bulbs

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  • Invisible Led Turn Signal Bulbs

    • Just found these the other day and I’m thinking of putting them in my car because they will keep an oem look.
    Thoughts?
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07THHV2F5..._xNkLEb2WJH54E

    UPDATE:

    Bought them and they are dim. Going to try these next

    Update 2

    The Putco bulbs work very well.

    https://www.rvupgradestore.com/Putco...a.htm?CartID=2
    Last edited by carlthetruckguy; May 9th, 2020, 05:06 PM.

  • #2
    I am guessing they will be 20-25% less bright then normal bulbs without the chrome cover but it might still be enough. I hope they are not dimmer than halogen. I remember chrome halogen bulbs being significantly dimmer than amber halogen bulbs.

    If you buy them post some pictures please.
    Last edited by Crossgolf; April 14th, 2020, 12:58 PM.
    Subaru Outback retrofit:
    http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/show...aru-Outback-H6
    License plate lights with dual brightness:
    https://www.hidplanet.com/forums/for...hen-backing-up

    Comment


    • #3
      Apparently is isn’t really solid chrome, it is more like a one way glass style tint.

      Comment


      • #4
        They sure look good but the amazon reviews are mixed.
        Subaru Outback retrofit:
        http://www.hidplanet.com/forums/show...aru-Outback-H6
        License plate lights with dual brightness:
        https://www.hidplanet.com/forums/for...hen-backing-up

        Comment


        • #5
          $14 might be worth it to try it, but I wouldn't have very high hopes. Why don't you want the regular LED ones?

          Comment


          • #6
            I wouldn't really be a fan of these, since the LEDs are all spaced all over the place, not focused in the right place for the reflectors. So, they might appear really bright in comparison to stock when looked at a random angle, but not from the angle that matters. So people might turn them on and walk around back and look down at it and be like "wow that's bright", but at a distance, it might hardly show up at all.

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            • #7
              Those look pretty cool, and I'm curious how the chrome tint affects the bulb.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ak_cowboy View Post
                $14 might be worth it to try it, but I wouldn't have very high hopes. Why don't you want the regular LED ones?
                Sounds like for aesthetics. Some LED bulb designs are pretty ugly through a clear lens, while some like the OG Philips Ultinons and Visions or Sylvania Zevos may not look OEM but still look stylish and actually perform well (except the amber Zevos LOL)
                Originally posted by HK45
                I don't even look to see what Eddie writes anymore. I'm too busy staring at his avatar.

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                • #9
                  I’m looking at getting these because you can see my turn signal bulbs very easily and I don’t like the way most LED bulbs look.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Unfortunately you are sacrificing the quality of a good performing (safe) turn signal beam for a horrible one that does not have the same photometrical properties as filament based bulb -- all for aesthetic purposes.

                    A bunch of light shining everywhere doesn't mean its properly visible at all the required angles defined in the regulatory lighting standard.

                    Each filament bulb has a tolerance box where the light source must be positioned. The lamp optics are built around this focal point. Illumination outside of the tolerance box just ends up being stray light that is not focused and the intensity is low, although it *appears* to be high because there is more of it.



                    www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No disrespect meant but I not so sure I agree.
                      Just hear me out guys..
                      With headlights I understand the importance of correct beam composition because the bulb used is very bright and car blind other driver.
                      However, the incandescent turn signal bulbs used are not bright, in fact the purpose of the reflective surface is to make them shine in all directions and be more visible.
                      The main reason this is needed, again, is cause the turn signal bulb is rather dim on its own. If one were not properly reflected as is the case with blacked out turn signals (ew) it would not be safe or visible.
                      However, theoretically, installing an omnidirectional brighter bulb would make the need for reflective panels no longer present. Not only this but with a design that has LED chips all over, it is guaranteed that at least one of those will be in line with the original halogen filament. Therefore benefiting from both raw output and the reflector.
                      I am 100% totally in agreement that led bulbs of this type are bad for any applications that is intended for driver visibility like backup lights or headlamps, however since these bulbs are exceptionally good at throwing light all over (think how they blind other driver and spread all over in low beam applications) I think they are actually more beneficial in a turn signal and daytime running light application.
                      Sorry for the long post and thanks for reading.
                      Last edited by carlthetruckguy; April 16th, 2020, 09:32 PM. Reason: Typos

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by carlthetruckguy View Post
                        No disrespect meant but I not so sure I agree.
                        Just hear me out guys..
                        With headlights I understand the importance of correct beam composition because the bulb used is very bright and car blind other driver.
                        However, the incandescent turn signal bulbs used are not bright, in fact the purpose of the reflective surface is to make them shine in all directions and be more visible.
                        The main reason this is needed, again, is cause the turn signal bulb is rather dim on its own. If one were not properly reflected as is the case with blacked out turn signals (ew) it would not be safe or visible.
                        However, theoretically, installing an omnidirectional brighter bulb would make the need for reflective panels no longer present. Not only this but with a design that has LED chips all over, it is guaranteed that at least one of those will be in line with the original halogen filament. Therefore benefiting from both raw output and the reflector.
                        I am 100% totally in agreement that led bulbs of this type are bad for any applications that is intended for driver visibility like backup lights or headlamps, however since these bulbs are exceptionally good at throwing light all over (think how they blind other driver and spread all over in low beam applications) I think they are actually more beneficial in a turn signal and daytime running light application.
                        Sorry for the long post and thanks for reading.

                        Your theoretical POV of the functionality of a turn signal has no basis on facts and is completely false.

                        As I pointed out in my last post, the optics of a turn signal lamp are designed around the point light source (focal point) of the designated bulb filament. The reflector segments of the lamp are arranged to create a specific light pattern that is compliant to the regulatory photometry requirements. The intensities produced within the light pattern vary at specific angles so that they meet the minimum visibility requirements towards other drivers in both day and night conditions.

                        A flood beam of light emitting from a turn signal doesn’t necessarily mean it's more visible at varying distances and angles. Sure at close range shining on a garage wall it will always give the *impression* that you have more, better light (because the rays are converging closer) but there is a lack of focus that becomes much more apparent the farther you go back (when the rays diverge).

                        Focus matters -- not raw lumens. If the replacement light source does not mimic the filament in the same manner then the lamp optics cannot produce the intended light pattern with the correct intensity values at the appropriate angles for you to safely indicate to others that you're turning.

                        Check out this HERE for some testing on various turn signal bulbs.
                        www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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