Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Any new info on the upcoming XenonDepot Xtreme VF LED bulbs?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by upashi View Post

    You may want to check this below linked video, this is in small housing, but you can tell at distance effect of focused beam.

    https://flic.kr/p/2h3eJgQ

    To the Left is XTR and right is V3 Triton

    At beginning of the video, you see how much of volume you can receive from V3 Triton, but as I step back for more distance, then visibility reduction shows difference.

    That video is perfect to show it very well, thanks! My preference would be to have the more focused light for brake lights, and the wider crazy light for signals and DRLs and reverse lights.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by gold94corolla View Post
      My preference would be to have the more focused light for brake lights, and the wider crazy light for signals and DRLs and reverse lights.
      I would love to have both for the brakes LOL. Ever look at a Lexus NX's brake light? It has an independent brake-only section that's maybe 3 inches square at most with a cluster of super intense LEDs
      Originally posted by HK45
      I don't even look to see what Eddie writes anymore. I'm too busy staring at his avatar.

      Comment


      • #18
        I'll be able to do a V3 vs V6 vs Ultinon vs VF comparo soon.

        2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder
        2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Eddie View Post

          I would love to have both for the brakes LOL. Ever look at a Lexus NX's brake light? It has an independent brake-only section that's maybe 3 inches square at most with a cluster of super intense LEDs
          Same here. I'd love to have super intense brake lights that also have a wide spread. In my car, the V6's do have that wider visibility, but unfortunately it's just the bulb globe that's visible from most angles. Straight-on intensity from a distance with the V6 actually seems to be less than stock, which is no good. I'll be happy with the VF's as long as they exceed stock output while having a clean look, something that can't be said about any other LED that I've tried in my car's brake lights.

          I'm surprised Toyota/Lexus can get away with such tiny brake lights on the NX (and the new RAV4, which has only a small, square-ish brake light in each tail light). It's not just Toyota, but many manufacturers seem to be shrinking their brake lights now that LED's have pretty much taken over. The new Accord only has a thin little line of like 6 LED's in each tail light on all trims but the Touring (which gets an additional line of LED's on each side of the trunk lid). And let's not forget the 2011-14 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, with its crazy "atomic" tail lights. I believe they had a tiny circular cluster of LED's (or is it just a single LED?) per side dedicated to the brake lights that were so intense that they appeared larger than they actually were from a distance. That's a far cry from the 2006-2010 Hyundai Azera, which had something ridiculous like 108 LED's on its rear end (between the tail lights and the CHMSL), all of which were used for the brake lights. I remember being jealous because my then-new 2007 Accord "only" had 45 brake light LED's (15 per tail light, and 15 in the CHMSL) LOL.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by th23 View Post

            Same here. I'd love to have super intense brake lights that also have a wide spread. In my car, the V6's do have that wider visibility, but unfortunately it's just the bulb globe that's visible from most angles. Straight-on intensity from a distance with the V6 actually seems to be less than stock, which is no good. I'll be happy with the VF's as long as they exceed stock output while having a clean look, something that can't be said about any other LED that I've tried in my car's brake lights.

            I'm surprised Toyota/Lexus can get away with such tiny brake lights on the NX (and the new RAV4, which has only a small, square-ish brake light in each tail light). It's not just Toyota, but many manufacturers seem to be shrinking their brake lights now that LED's have pretty much taken over. The new Accord only has a thin little line of like 6 LED's in each tail light on all trims but the Touring (which gets an additional line of LED's on each side of the trunk lid). And let's not forget the 2011-14 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, with its crazy "atomic" tail lights. I believe they had a tiny circular cluster of LED's (or is it just a single LED?) per side dedicated to the brake lights that were so intense that they appeared larger than they actually were from a distance. That's a far cry from the 2006-2010 Hyundai Azera, which had something ridiculous like 108 LED's on its rear end (between the tail lights and the CHMSL), all of which were used for the brake lights. I remember being jealous because my then-new 2007 Accord "only" had 45 brake light LED's (15 per tail light, and 15 in the CHMSL) LOL.
            Those OEM application focus on purpose specific long range illumination, while satisfying minimum FMVSS safety required standard.

            its ideal to have to have both distance and angle range, but with limited amount of light source, design must select what is the best for application purpose.
            LED case is bit unique as smaller package can deliver high luminosity.
            At greater distance, 2000mm2 illuminating surface area and 5000mm2 surface area probably won't look much different. They both will "small something" then
            what counts towards " visible" is illumination intensity

            Same concept goes to viewing angle and intensity distribution.
            DOT certified reflector does have minimum safetly required reasonable beam distribution range covered, eventhough,,, it is really old outdated standard.

            Many may think wide angler range visibility is desired, but this also must be considered how far it can reach. To be able to see " illuminaton" especially in brighter ambient condition, it must reach minimum illumination intensity.


            See below image for some case study, it is bit exaggerated but hope I can explain concept and importance of beam quality.


            Case scenario
            Lamp A Modeled in Red Scatter wider but less beam focus
            Lamp B Modeled in Green Less spread but higher focus

            Modeled shape is "illumination's minimum recognizable intensity range"


            Traffic model A by Yoshi, on Flickr


            Small box on Y axis is cross traffic approaching vehicle. ( call it "target")


            In this Lamp B model, target can be within range as far as 7 unit away ( X axis count)

            narrow long range model by Yoshi, on Flickr

            However in lamp A case, it must be as close as 5 unit away distance for target to be within range.

            Wide model by Yoshi, on Flickr

            By the time, moving vehicle approach close enough to target vehicle, then wider scatter beam can be seen much more than model B case, but at that stage, visual recognition of the vehicle dominate over illumination recognition.

            Functional purpose of the lamp is not " showing" , even though, this still is an aftermarket lamp parts, it is nice to put ample amount of consideration to realize proper function as much as possible, I think that is also beauty beside aesthetic aspect. Bulb looks nice in my opinion too tho!

            It's look very clean in reflector!

            Comment

            Working...
            X