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Any experience with HLXG LED bulbs?

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  • Any experience with HLXG LED bulbs?

    I've noticed in AliExpress an LED Bulb brand called HLXG and surprisingly it got a very big range of LED bulbs and a lot of orders with positive reviews and neat prices.

    Especially, some of them claim to use Philips Lumileds Luxeon Z ES chips, which if true, is marvelous.

    Here is an example: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/hlxg...f3a41f494901-0 .

    Any idea? Also will they be ok to run them with closed dust covers for the high-beams?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Just another cheap crappy LED bulb. Don't pay attention to reviews as the majority of people have no concept of what a good beam pattern is. A beam that appears to the naked eye as "close" to the original halogen pattern is not enough to conclude that it actually IS a better beam. And many of those are in other countries which use an ECE code headlamp which is totally different than a US/SAE designed headlamp. Not sure where you are located but I can guarantee that US/SAE headlamps do not take kindly to 99% of the bulbs on the market.

    There are many LED headlight bulbs that use a 3-chip Luxeon Z ES array (many use fake clone Z ES chips). But that does not guarantee that it is a great bulb. Or even a good bulb. Because there are many other factors (other than mimicking the filament dimensions) that are required in the design to make it potentially a suitable halogen replacement.

    1. Chip to chip spacing - In order to give good optical performance, the thickness between both sides of the LED boards must be no greater than roughly 2.5mm (depending on chip package height). The thinner it is the better the beam. How is this accomplished? By a single dual-sided MCPCB. The majority of LED bulbs on the market have two PCBs pasted to a center aluminum post. This combination can create a chip to chip spacing of 4mm and up. The thicker it is, the worse the beam pattern becomes. Now, the HLXG bulb does not specify the specs to this spacing but this bulb appears to be using two PCBs which, unless the center aluminum post is no greater than 1mm in thickness (which it most likely is not) than this will not provide optimum optical performance. This is why LED bulbs using a single dual sided MCPCB (like the SL1) will always be better, like this...

    (EKlight LED)


    (BTauto LED)



    ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​2. Chip distance - The distance from the collar to the bottom of the last chip die must be at a precise height. Most manufacturers are mimicking the distance of the halogen filament but that is wrong! I have verified and documented that the distance on the H11/9/8 applications must be pushed up 1mm higher for optimal beam performance. For the 9005/9006 I suspect is the same however I cannot fully confirm at this time as I only have a few 9005 lamps and need a few more for testing. Other applications may or may not apply.

    3. Thermal design - Hot Lumen. Most LED bulb designs have a poor thermal system. Although the designs are continually getting better most of them exhibit what is referred to as hot lumen. Once the bulb is turned on the LED chips rise in temperature and the light flux starts dropping fast. This is why taking measurements immediately after turning them on is a bad practice because the bulb is still warming up and losing output. The heatsink is incapable of drawing enough heat away to keep the LED chips stable and operating at their optimum performance level. What this means is lower than advertised output levels and a guaranteed short life span. I've tested bulbs that lose 30-40% of light output within a 60 minute period! That is ridiculous. The SL1 has the BEST thermal design on the market, hands down (no shocker there). There is a reason why it has what some of you consider an ugly rough cast finish. Its because it plain works! The zinc casting and fins all do what their designed to do and that's extract heat away from the LED chips. How good is it? I tested a 7% light decay rate after 60 minutes. From the point of being powered on (5 seconds in) until 60 minutes later. With the SL1 you essentially have full light output from the moment you turn them on until the end of your end of your destination. Most of the cheap bulbs from China get too hot and lose too much light.

    With all this being said, it is important to understand that despite a LED bulb having all the key ingredients shown above it does not always guarantee good beam performance.

    Some lamps, reflector and projector, just do not take kindly to anything other than a halogen bulb. Due to their complex reflector designs a metal body that is not transparent, such as that of a glass halogen bulb, will disrupt the beam and cast heavy shadows no matter which way the bulb is clocked. I have tested some that do increase the hotspot but reduce light flux in other areas of the beam. And because of this, it cannot be considered an upgrade. Not because it is a bad bulb. Because it just isn't compatible with the lamp.

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    • #3
      Wow, that's a great and detailed research you've done there mate. Great job! So yea, for low-beams my car has a projector so I'm using HIDs. I just wanted a pair of decently priced LEDs just for the high beams. I had a cheap pair with braided copper belts for cooling, it looked better than halogens but ye not ideal. So, I was thinking of switching to a more decent LED set for the high-beams. I don't use my high-beams very often but still I'm also concerned about the cooling since my headlights got a closed housing that seals with dust covers. Also the size for mine is H1, which narrows down my options quite a lot. As for the country, I'm located in Europe. For low beams, I guess I wouldn't go to LEDs yet and stay with HIDs. I was just not sure which ballast would have the longest longevity, a 35W AC regular one (from a decent company) or an F3 Fast Bright or Hylux? The F3 & Hylux are both fast starting and reach like 8-9A each on startup, which sets the dilemma, are they worth the extra money for reliability if they are more aggressive?

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      • #4
        I have used H4 LED from HLXg and it works well. However high beam has suffered while low beam has improved. I am also using it inside closed headlight cover and no issues yet although ive only ever used them for 45 minutes max and its winters anyway keeping everything cooler.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by puneet_India View Post
          I have used H4 LED from HLXg and it works well. However high beam has suffered while low beam has improved. I am also using it inside closed headlight cover and no issues yet although ive only ever used them for 45 minutes max and its winters anyway keeping everything cooler.
          Great to know. The beam pattern isn't really a massive issue for me since I will use them only for high-beams, just when I need some extra light in difficult situations.

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          • #6
            A LED drop-in aftermarket bulb can never be good for a projector application, or a high beam reflector, because on both cases you need 360 degrees light on all directions.

            LED bulbs with LEDs on opposite sides of a PCB (or just one side) can never reproduce this.

            They can only work on a reflector based low beam, depending of the bulb and of the design of the reflector.

            Chevrolet Astra 2.0
            OEM Hella E55 frosted lens with 4-position Eletric Leveling
            Yeaky 5500k @ Hyluxtek ASIC DSP 50W

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            • #7
              Not true, many reflectors don't use the direct top and bottom of the reflector surface anyway. LEDs work wonderfully in reproducing high beam patterns.

              2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder
              2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

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              • #8
                What???? Most high beam are round to exactly use all sides, top and bottom, so you can have light going in all directions, but manly a round focused beam so you can have distance.

                LED bulbs can never work in that scenario, no matter how you rotate the bulb, you will have top bottom light, or you have left/right light.

                Thats why they can work in low beam reflectors, because those yes only use an area of the reflector to project the light.

                Most OEM high beam reflectors have this design (the inner part of the headlight of course).

                Last edited by Alberto; January 10th, 2019, 02:15 AM.

                Chevrolet Astra 2.0
                OEM Hella E55 frosted lens with 4-position Eletric Leveling
                Yeaky 5500k @ Hyluxtek ASIC DSP 50W

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Haloruler64 View Post
                  Not true, many reflectors don't use the direct top and bottom of the reflector surface anyway. LEDs work wonderfully in reproducing high beam patterns.
                  I totally agree with you!

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                  • #10
                    LED bulbs have improved beam and brightness.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Alberto View Post
                      What???? Most high beam are round to exactly use all sides, top and bottom, so you can have light going in all directions, but manly a round focused beam so you can have distance.

                      LED bulbs can never work in that scenario, no matter how you rotate the bulb, you will have top bottom light, or you have left/right light.

                      Thats why they can work in low beam reflectors, because those yes only use an area of the reflector to project the light.

                      Most OEM high beam reflectors have this design (the inner part of the headlight of course).
                      Mmmmhhh. Iím not sure about that, but Iím a novice.

                      Thinking of an H4 bulb (with a shield in the bottom part) I would agree with you. But if I think of other bulbs commonly used for low beams (H7; H11) the light is reflected by the full reflector, and not only by a portion of it. What you probably have is re-reflection of reflected beam that aim the light to the corrrect position - hence the complex surface of the reflector.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Alberto View Post
                        What???? Most high beam are round to exactly use all sides, top and bottom, so you can have light going in all directions, but manly a round focused beam so you can have distance.

                        LED bulbs can never work in that scenario, no matter how you rotate the bulb, you will have top bottom light, or you have left/right light.
                        LEDs can and do work well in high beams. Of course, dependent on the LED bulb brand.

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                        • #13
                          For me it doesn't make sense.

                          There are very good halogen bulbs with much more lumens than regulars (Osram NightBrakers and Philips Xtremes), with short lifespan of course, but for the application that is rarely used is perfect, and they are whiter than the regular halogen.

                          You don't use your high beam long enough to justify this (in most cases).

                          And that the high beam reflector is designed for a halogen bulb. You can see in the pictures, no one reproduce the perfect beam of the first halogen.

                          A HID bulb would be light years better because of similarities with halogen spread, and 3x more lumens (if you want the headache for this). The only disadvantage here would be that HID takes time to give 100% light, what could me minimized with FastBright ballasts.

                          But of course, if you want waste money trying to find a bulb that will rarely be used for your high beam, go for it.
                          Last edited by Alberto; January 11th, 2019, 02:53 AM.

                          Chevrolet Astra 2.0
                          OEM Hella E55 frosted lens with 4-position Eletric Leveling
                          Yeaky 5500k @ Hyluxtek ASIC DSP 50W

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                          • #14
                            There are also many leds that give 360 degree light output but most say that 360 approach isn't correct to give the perfect beam pattern. So, no idea. I'm not much concerned about the high beam pattern but for decent light output, instant on and decent reliability.

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                            • #15
                              Right, so I received them today. Surprisingly, they look awesomely well built with great materials and solid construction all the way around. The LED chips seem like real Philips Lumileds but the issue is that I can't close my stock dust cover with the LEDs and their driver inside. My problem is not the LEDs themselves, since they're pretty small in all dimensions. My problem is the driver behind them. Sadly, the driver is not detachable so I can't place it externally. So what you recommend me? Is there any chance of finding custom dust covers for my car? (I personally doubt since it's an old 95 one). Should I ditch those and go for fanless designs, like with braided copper belts? Or should I modify them myself, and lengthen the wires in order to place the driver outside? Also, is it worth the fuss or they will still overheat inside a sealed headlight assembly? (Usage will be for High-Beam, so probably not for long periods).

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