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Sylvania launches LED low beam bulbs! (9006, H7, H11)

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  • #16
    There are LED manufacturers that have already started producing chips in the shape of a filament.

    IPF Japan co-developed this chip below with Lextar for the sole purpose of replicating the halogen filament. The beam shots I've seen look very good. A much smoother beam fill because of the one piece design. There will always be some faint streaks in the beam from 3 chip Luxeon Z ES arrays no matter how tight they are stacked next to each other.



    www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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    • #17
      Hmm, I'd like to try one of those. I heard good things about IPF as well, form one user.

      2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder
      2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Nuvolari View Post
        Why canít they replicate a very thin LED strip in the shape of the original filament, or even slightly thicker, inside a glass capsule to provide the light? I have Feit candelabra house bulbs that do just this, and they are equally as bright as the incandescent bulbs they replaced. Maybe even a little brighter.

        It seems almost unbelievable that they canít find the right materials and packaging. I think they just donít really care to.
        True but the glass isn’t really needed... and it’s always a matter of having output but managing heat at the same time. Also there need a demand (which is pretty much non existent) to justify the R&D costs. From the posts above the chips exist but it needs to be implemented properly.

        Originally posted by Eddie View Post
        Damn $200...might be better off waiting for that $150 Diode Dynamics pnp LED
        200 CAD and Advanced auto had them listed at 150 USD. However when you add canadian taxes + shipping you are back at ~200 USD. At least it’s all in.

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        • #19
          After seeing the actual stock photo of the Sylvania on the canadiantire website I was surprised to see that the chips look VERY similar to the Luxeon Z ES. I mean damn near identical. This throws my theory of these bulbs using Ceramos chips out the window as they look nothing like what Osram has in their portfolio.

          I know that cross licensing occurs between all the big name LED manufacturers so perhaps this is one of those deals? Although I can't understand it if that's the case. Why borrower tech from a competitor unless you know its superior to yours?







          I discovered the same thing when I saw that Stanley Electric also released their new LED headlight bulbs under their Raybrig brand. Instead of developing or choosing from their own portfolio, they went with...you guessed it...Luxeon Z ES.



          www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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          • #20
            I doubt PNP LED sales at the $200 price point are high enough to justify developing your own chip. Unless you're China.

            2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder
            2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

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            • #21
              9006, h7 and h11 are all sizes that are easily and cheaply massively upgradable with cheap halogen bulbs.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by rdriggett View Post
                9006, h7 and h11 are all sizes that are easily and cheaply massively upgradable with cheap halogen bulbs.
                You cannot get both output and color with halogen bulbs. You lose significant output when you want a white light using halogen bulbs.

                The first gen H4 Ultinon from Philips proves that a properly engineered LED bulb can give a lot more output with a good beam pattern (see test lab youtube channel) and a nice white color that is not replicated with a halogen bulb. The closest to white color I have tested is the European 4300k Crystal Vision halogen bulb but its output is almost half of a regular halogen.

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                • #23
                  I have a cheapo Amazon H4 bulb on my motorcycle and the output is pretty effing good.

                  I still think virtual filaments are the way forward for LED retrofit bulbs. That IPF design is interesting though.

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                  • #24
                    Well if anyone is interested, I tried the H7 (H7LED.BX2) and the verdict is...they suck, at least in my application. Test car was a VW Rabbit (MK5 Golf) upgraded with Hella halogen projector headlights (ECE pattern). The headlights look identical to the OEM bi xenon but I don't know what projector they use. I only wanted the white color of LED and did not care for superior performance, just something as good as a regular halogen but better than the blue coated bulbs.

                    The bulbs seem to be under powered but I did not have a multimeter to test them. On the front of box it says 17W, the side says 14W and the driver says 22W. This type of inconsistency does not make Sylvania look good. I also noticed that there were typos and mistakes for the French translation on the box, looks like they used google translate.

                    It's a shame because they had potential. I wanted a clean and elegant pnp solution and the Sylvania was super compact and it easily fit inside the housing, along with the driver (which doesn't get hot). It looked like quality and and I am pretty sure that the design of the heat sink is proprietary. Yes it has a fan but there's a 5 year warranty.

                    I know the H7 from XenonDepot is promising but I don't like the idea of having super long fins bunched up in the housing.

                    Who knows maybe they will work better in a reflector? Anyway the H11 and 9006 versions are sold in the US https://www.autozone.com/electrical-...17_301311_1556 but they are marketed as fogs unlike here in Canada where they are sold as headlight bulbs. The packages are different too. Maybe it has something to do with DOT laws where bulbs have to be certified to be sold at retailers? Because H7 will always be a headlight bulb and it's not available at all in the US.

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                    • #25
                      That's too bad. I stopped into a local Advanced Auto store because online it said that they had the H11 in stock. But when I went in there they could not find in the back. They think it was an error which probably was the case because all other stores within a 50 mile radius said they didn't stock them. I was going to order them online to test them out but hesitated pulling the trigger for the price.

                      What sucked about them? Do you have any before/after shots of the beams? How about close ups of the LED chips?
                      www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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                      • #26
                        I did the install in my driveway and since I don't have a garage I had no way to take adequate wall shots. Just did a quick drive but after seeing the results I did not bother to take before after pictures on the road. Basically just dim and the beam pattern wasn't the same as stock. For some reason the slope of the "up-sweep" was too much. Maybe it had to do with the bulbs being incompatible with ECE I don't know but like I said I think they are under powered which shouldn't be the case because they have active cooling. Like I said maybe they will work with other projectors or reflectors. Here are some pictures of the bulbs I took.





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                        • #27
                          Hey thanks for the pics! Something has bothered me ever since I saw the closeups of the chips - and that is the spacing between each chip. It seems rather large when compared to other marketed 3-chip LED bulbs! And in your photo its even more obvious next to the H7 filament. I wonder if this is adversely affecting your beam performance more than power. Even at 17W that's still plenty of power for a bright output (of course if the light source were focused).

                          A typical H7 filament is about 4.12mm long. Even if the Luxeon emitters were butted right up next to each other they would still be too long (4.92mm long). So add in the current spacing and you got a light source that doesn't quite match the original filament. I want to say that Diode Dynamics places theirs as close as possible for this very reason.




                          However its really hard to say if that truly is the problem. Or perhaps its the Y-axis alignment of the LEDs. The H7 filament is offset to the Y-axis. It does not reside in the centerline. From the image of the Sylvania LED bulb, the optical center of the chips are centered directly on the same axis as the bulb cover screws.
                          www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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                          • #28
                            Those all are valid points especially when comparing with pictures of the DD SL1. Both bulbs are very similar but the DD SL1 appears better engineered. Too bad they don't plan on making a H7.

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