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OEM LED headlamps: the past, present and future

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  • #46
    That doesn't make any sense. If it has HID but 'just uses the LED for lowbeam and DRL' then what does it use the HID for?
    2000 Celica GTS 'slowest gts evar'
    1998 Mazda 626 FS-DE/CD4E 'mom-mobile'

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    • #47
      Maybe same as this one (all led)

      https://torega.wordpress.com/2016/09...ight-teardown/

      Only side projector (bigger one) is working as low+high beam
      Smaller one act as "dummy"
      That is i've been told by the owner

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      • #48
        Originally posted by tjeret View Post
        Maybe same as this one (all led) https://torega.wordpress.com/2016/09...ight-teardown/ Only side projector (bigger one) is working as low+high beam Smaller one act as "dummy" That is i've been told by the owner
        Thanks for posting that. Interesting reflector/collimator array directly in front of those array of LEDs...
        Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

        3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

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        • #49
          that looks almost identical to what they use on 15+ Sierras. Except it's a completely flat shield with a dip for oncoming traffic
          2006 Chevy Cobalt - SRX Bi-xenon/Denso 35w
          2011 GMC Terrain V6 - 4TL-R retrofit

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          • #50
            That's pretty awesome. An all in one hi/low led projector that does high beam with activation of LED's vs mechanical movement of the shield. Less mechanical parts to malfunction!

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            • #51
              Interesting that AL-Lighting uses a few different designs under their LED portfolio. I wonder what the reason for using one design versus another in a given vehicle. Perhaps electrical load or size determine which is to be used based on the OEs requirements.



              www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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              • #52
                Yea, probably due to the specs the manufacturer needs. I think they use different LED's as well in different projectors.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by evo77 View Post
                  Yes this module has two separate emitters (low and high). 130 is the low beam chip and is forward facing. It doesn't appear to have any reflector. 140 is the high beam chip while 150 is the reflector for it. You'll notice the angle that it pitches which converges to the optical center and then translates to the lens for the beam patterns. 120 is of course the heat sink.
                  I knew it would only be a matter of time before they ditched the reflector, but I'm really curious as to how they will control the beam with what looks like a simple convex lens. I have an idea in my head of what a lens that could project a low beam ready source would look like.... and it's definitely not this. If they can actually get the beam out of this design, I'd be seriously impressed.

                  Next phase is the virtual filament to for halogen/HID retrofit bulbs. No COB crap, has to be done through optics.

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                  • #54
                    I recently saw this.... 84 chips in one projector. 84!!

                    https://youtu.be/0OJjvYPV3oc

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                    • #55
                      This headlight (multibeam LED) is made in Hella Front Lighting, in my country (Slovakia). I was there for visit, i had this multichip in hand, very nice work. Is much more precise , than basic HID projector. But what was very interesting, the lens is made from plastic material. lens is similar as frosted lens, but little bit different.


                      I think, how go forward in LED retrofi is use similar principe - use the OBDII and steering wheel sensor to get first aftermarket LED projector. Of course, this OEM headlight has much more better control of LED modules, with camera, but this is not really easy to develop.

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                      • #56
                        Yeah, that pixel beam (or matrix as its commonly known as) has been around for a while and every top tier auto lamp manufacturer has refined their owned versions of that lighting system. Even manufacturers wanting to jump in the game with the big boys, like Everlight, who are ramping up their automotive lighting portfolio.

                        Here is their latest offering. 24 emitters. Doesn't look very purdy when you compare against Hella or AL-Light/Magneti Marelli.




                        In the fall of 2016, Osram announced their collaboration efforts with Daimler, Hella, Infinieon and others to develop a new LED headlamp. Get this,3 led modules per lamp containing 1,024 chips EACH module. And each chip can be individually controlled! How's that for precise beam control?





                        www.automotiveLEDresearch.com

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                        • #57
                          Holy Cow, look at the solder work on that tiny chip.
                          I highly doubt all this stuff can be implemented for aftermarket since OEMs use many microprocessors to make it all fully work.

                          All of a sudden HID seems so simple, haha.

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                          • #58
                            If each of the emitter in that 32x32 array have their own lenses, then that would be similar to how camera-on-a-chip makes camera solutions more compact (as in part of a smartphone instead of a dedicated SLR camera; that is not to say that SLR's performance is inferior).
                            Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                            3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by satrya View Post
                              If each of the emitter in that 32x32 array have their own lenses, then that would be similar to how camera-on-a-chip makes camera solutions more compact (as in part of a smartphone instead of a dedicated SLR camera; that is not to say that SLR's performance is inferior).
                              honestly though, the camera phone chips are getting so good, they are starting to hurt slr sales. it used to be phone camera's were so bad, you needed an slr for decent shots. now, i can't tell the difference between something shot on a phone camera and most slr's.

                              i know there's a difference in pixel count and low light noise. but for the most part, neither of those matter until you'r either constantly shooting at night, or need to blow the image up to fill large posters or whatever.
                              The time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted time

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                              • #60
                                IMO, pixel count and low light noise are not the differentiating factor between phones and SLRs. A good phone can take wonderful low light shots. But to me, it's instantly obvious which is which just from the characteristics and sheer quality. Of course, we're not talking $500 budget DSLRs here.

                                2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder
                                2017 Lexus CT200h F Sport

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