Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

5,500 Kelvin–the perfect white light for nighttime illumination?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 5,500 Kelvin–the perfect white light for nighttime illumination?

    So these articles about the new Audi R8 claims that 5500K is the best for nighttime illumination and ideal conditions for the human eye that enable the driver to recognize contrast more easily and help prevent fatigue.

    From what I've learned is that aprrox 4300k provides the most lumen, but apparently 5500k although lower in lumen, the colour makes it the best for night time driving? does this mean that next time I buy HID for my car i should get some 5500k?

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/20...i-r8-lmx-news/
    http://www.wired.com/2014/05/audi-r8...er-headlights/

  • #2
    (1) I wouldn't take articles like that at face value; even technical results from peer-reviewed journals don't have that privilege
    (2) "5500 K" (or any other color) is a single number used to represent the overall impression of color; if you look at the spectral density across different frequencies, there are infinite combinations of spectral density distributions that can be deemed to have the same "average" color. But some of them may be more evenly distributed in the frequency range that our eyes can see.
    (3) "5500 K" from a blue laser + phosphor, blue LED + phosphor, or HID bulb with its choice of salts and glass coating may have dramatically different color spectrum distribution.
    (4) If one of the "5500 K" choice indeed allows best contrast (probably due to a good color rendering index / CRI) and causes less fatigue, it doesn't mean that all "5500 K" enjoys the same benefit.
    Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

    3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

    Comment


    • #3
      just to add to what is said above.

      OP has to remember a few things.



      5000k hid~ 5000k LED~ and 5000k Lasers~5000k halogen is not the same.


      for example:

      a 5000k hid ( pure white light) is the same (or close to) 5500k LED. as stated by satrya above, the numbers are are not finite.




      however we can take this one step further, lets use the HID color spectrum here:

      6000k (pure white with a hint of blue AKA diamond white) is actually the best color for winter, this is because in winter everything is white. now of course im referring to a true white winter, with -30C and snow everywhere like in Alaska. 6000k pure white with hint of blue will travel the farthest and give the best definition when everything you are looking at is white.

      however, on the flip side 6000k is horrible for rain or wet roads, or even flurries/snowing.

      4300k (pure white with hint of yellow) is the best light for rain, and regular deep brown, grey, black, deep green colors. 4300k will give you the best contrast in wet/ dry roads, hence why all OEM hid are 4300k, because 95% of cars are sold in lower north America where it predominately rains alot and winters/snow storms are short.


      now here 5000k comes along. 5000 is pure white. alot of people find this color to be a good compromise of the two above. not as good in the snow as 6000k, and not as good in rain as 4300k, but works well all around.
      but remember, most people go with 5000k because it looks nice , not many go for its functionality. looks= 5000K CBI's and functionality = 4300Knightbreakers




      now back to OP original two links.

      when the article states that "5500k is the best color" what standard are they using? are they saying a 5500k color when compared to the solar spectrum? LED spectrum? HID spectrum? we dont really know???? however we can make a few educated assumptions.

      having seen many demonstrations of these "laser headlights" ive noticed that the light thats given off is very similar to HID 4300k color ( perhaps its 4500k-ish but this could just be from the added brightness), which makes sense because 4300k is the industry standard for maximum contrast, and best "over all" use of the color spectrum that your eyes are attuned to vs the kinds of conditions seen by motorists.


      here is a good example of what i mean. look below at the laser headlight the color is clearly pure white with a hint of yellow ( aka 4300k/4500k-ish), the color below is most defiantly not 5500k, no where near infact.



      so the article should actually say, 4500k is the best light to be used. but that probably doesn't interest alot of people, they rather make a headline that catches more eyes and draws people in.
      Last edited by michael.kozera; October 6th, 2015, 12:57 AM.
      Octa projectors, eight OEM bulbs, ~30,000lm , and 169 degrees of driving heaven!

      Comment


      • #4
        ^agreed

        The contrast factor is the only plus for the white lights, and the cons are plenty.

        The main con is on wet conditions mentioned above. White/blue light is reflected by water and you will see absolutely nothing.

        The second is eye fatigue.

        The light from the sun from which we all evolved is more like 4300k (yellowish white from the hydrogen fusion into helium).

        So it's more easy on every human eye then 5000k or more.

        And third, HID lights have better efficiency on the ~4500k color spectrum. In order to have enough lumens at 6000k or more, you will need 70W or more of power out of the ballast.

        Now considering LED and laser tech, is another thing. LED/Laser tech is far more efficient on the white color spectrum side. So they have to use less power to have the same lumens as ~4300k OEM HID. Plus there is the "cool" factor of a white light that sells more than yellowish. Adding both things seems to make OEM manufacturers to change their minds and they are going to the white light side.

        Thats why all LED headlights are more on the whitish 5000K+ side.

        But still, physically speaking, they won't be as safe on rain conditions as yellowish HID, and will fatigue the eyes more.
        Last edited by Alberto; October 6th, 2015, 01:34 AM.

        Chevrolet Astra 2.0
        OEM Hella E55 frosted lens with 4-position Eletric Leveling
        Yeaky 5500k @ Hyluxtek ASIC DSP 50W

        Comment


        • #5
          i would grab LED or Laser light that produce output similar to 3700~3800~4300k halogen light

          Comment


          • #6
            Depends on your own eyes as well, I have a terrible time with anything bluer than 4500K.
            2000 Celica GTS 'slowest gts evar'
            1998 Mazda 626 FS-DE/CD4E 'mom-mobile'

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ^pomen_GTR^ View Post
              i would grab LED or Laser light that produce output similar to 3700~3800~4300k halogen light
              that_guy_318 managed to get TRS to do a special build / group buy for 3800K xb35 D2S; maybe he can get TRS to create (out of thin air) LED or Laser units in that color range. I'm in
              Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

              3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

              Comment


              • #8
                I knew it wasn't going to be apples to apples because it's lasers, but still wanted to pick people's brains about it. There's just so much variables that come into play and Kelvin can't be the deciding factor. I'll stick with quality 4300k HIDs. Thanks guys!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't believe the laser solutions are available for retrofit at this point anyway. The OE LED ones (e.g. MDX, Murano, Rogue, Corolla, Q50, ... ) are there, and then there's also the PnP LED (not recommended).
                  Jul 2012 ROTM (3-way quad headlight) ; Sep 2015 ROTM (custom muli-lens 7" fogs)

                  3-way quad wiring; foreground limiter; squirrel finder;

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by michael.kozera View Post
                    having seen many demonstrations of these "laser headlights" ive noticed that the light thats given off is very similar to HID 4300k color ( perhaps its 4500k-ish but this could just be from the added brightness), which makes sense because 4300k is the industry standard for maximum contrast, and best "over all" use of the color spectrum that your eyes are attuned to vs the kinds of conditions seen by motorists.
                    One little problem with this that makes this statement nearly meaningless is that we do not know what white balance setting the photographers who took the photos of the headlights used. Ive seen a lot of pictures of the laser and LED headlights too and the general tendency you would have is that the LED and lasers light appears about the same color temperature as their HID counterpart. However there was a video BMW posted comparing a bixenon headlight to their laser headlights with the white balance setting fixed and then it was very obvious the laser headlights were much bluer than the HIDs. I posted that video on HID planet but will probably have a hard time digging it up. Overall cameras and pictures are nearly useless at determining the color temperature of a given light source.
                    Last edited by ImagioX1; October 9th, 2015, 07:54 AM.
                    Custom shield service not available at this time.

                    PM is not a great way to reach me. Email me at imagioX1@outlook.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      whitebalance correction factor FTW!

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X